Category: Sins of Omission

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The Tuskegee Airmen

If you think political correctness is a recent phenomenon in America, then the longtime promulgation and perpetuation of distortions and falsehoods concerning the Tuskegee Airmen should disabuse you of such a notion. The very creation of the group was an attempt by President Franklin Roosevelt to showcase . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to...

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Divine Wind

Many Americans today are left aghast at Adm. William F. Halsey’s admonition to U.S. forces in the Pacific: “Kill Japs.  Kill Japs.  Kill More Japs!  You will help to kill the yellow bastards if you do your job well.”  Yet those who fought through the island campaigns . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to...

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Bombing the West Coast

The “Battle of Los Angeles,” or the Great Los Angeles Air Raid, occurred during the early morning hours of February 25, 1942.  It has been portrayed in Steven Spielberg’s 1979 slapstick comedy 1941, starring Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi.  The farcical movie is about all younger generations today . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now...

The Betsy Ross of California
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The Betsy Ross of California

Gov. Jerry Brown recently signed legislation requiring public schools to teach students about the contributions of “lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Americans.”  When I was young, we were taught about men and, yes, women in California, not because of their “sexual orientation” but because they were figures of substance . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe...

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James Arness

Early in June, James Arness died.  Everyone thinks of him as Matt Dillon, the brave and incorruptible town marshal of Dodge City in the television series Gunsmoke.  I think of him as the father of one of my childhood friends and as one of the last actors in Hollywood . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe...

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Chuck Older

Recently, a younger acquaintance of mine, an actor on stage and screen, mentioned with disgust the circus-like atmosphere that pervaded the trial of O.J. Simpson for the murder of his ex-wife.  I noted that early on in the trial, Judge Lance Ito simply lost . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to access the full...

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Jumpin’ Jim Gavin

Like most kids I loved reading about Americans who rose from nothing to greatness.  When I got to college and encountered my first left-wing history professor, I learned that Horatio Alger characters were pure myth—except I had already read and heard about dozens of them.  One of . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to...

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The Fighting Marine: Gene Tunney

Though he beat Jack Demp­sey decisively the two times they met in the ring, was undefeated as a heavyweight, and retired as heavyweight champion, Gene Tunney is often forgotten when today’s era of fight fans or others discuss the greatest heavyweights.  Political correctness doesn’t allow us . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to access...

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Dan Daly

A friend recently sent me an e-mail with a link to YouTube.  A click took me to a tribute to Col. Bob Howard, broadcast by NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams upon Howard’s death just before Christmas 2009.  Howard is one of our . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to access the full article...

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The Man Who Won the Revolution

Every history textbook has a paragraph or more devoted to Crispus Attucks, who, besides being half black and half Indian and one of those killed in the Boston Massacre, was of little historical significance.  Nearly everything else said about him is a matter of speculation.  In these . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to...

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Red Cloud’s War

The Oglala Sioux chief Red Cloud is generally portrayed as someone who chewed up the U.S. Army in battle after battle.  He was, in the words of one author, “the first and only Indian leader in the West to win a war with the United States.”  This conclusion . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now...

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Lucky Lindy

Nearly everyone knows that in 1927 Charles Lindbergh made the first nonstop solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean, lifting off from a field on Long Island and touching down in Paris 33 hours and 3,600 miles later.  He instantly became an American hero of proportions never before seen . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now...

Pancho Villa
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Pancho Villa

There are hundreds of Mexican restaurants in the United States named for the revolutionary Pancho Villa.  Photos of the Durango native line the walls, and his raid on the small American hamlet of Columbus, New Mexico, is celebrated.  Nowhere is mentioned the many atrocities Villa and his forces regularly . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe...

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The Flying Tigers

The first “paper & stick” model airplane I ever made was a Curtiss P-40 Warhawk.  I painted it in the color scheme of the famed Flying Tigers, including the shark’s mouth on the cowl and air scoop.  Mine was powered not by a 1040 horsepower V-12 . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to access...

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The Noble Savage

A sequel to Dances With Wolves is reportedly scheduled for release in 2011.  Not only did Dances create a romantic American Indian who never existed, it reversed the roles of the Sioux and the Pawnee.  This kind of thing has been going on for hundreds . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to access the...

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Hiroshima and Nagasaki

I recently saw a video clip of a television talk-show host calling President Truman a war criminal for authorizing the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  I have heard others make similar comments.  During the late 1960’s it became almost de rigueur on college campuses . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to access the...

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Mr. Outside: Glenn Davis

As the 20th century drew to a close lists of the century’s greatest figures in various fields of endeavor appeared regularly in newspapers and magazines.  Revealing that memories were short, the lists tended to be dominated by figures of recent vintage, especially in the sports world . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to access...

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Epic But Forgotten: Peleliu

Few Americans today know of Peleliu, a speck of an island in the southwest Pacific.  A part of the Palau group of the Caroline Islands, Peleliu is only six miles long and two miles wide.  It lies 550 miles due east of the Philippines in splendid isolation . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to...

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What Really Happened on Hotrocks

Little did I know that when I entered junior high I would be confronting red-diaper babies.  These kids were intellectually sophisticated and well educated.  They told me many things that were contrary to my instincts.  Having little knowledge of the subjects they addressed so adroitly, I was at . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now...

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Fastest Jewish Gun in the West

Frank Gallop’s 1966 spoof recording, “The Ballad of Irving,” left most people laughing heartily.  (“He came from the old Bar Mitzvah spread, / With a 10-gallon yarmulke on his head. / He always followed his mother’s wishes. / Even on the range he used two sets of dishes.”)  What . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe...

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Lieutenant Ramsey’s War

Ed Ramsey never aspired to be a hero.  He was only 12 years old when his father committed suicide.  He was a natural-born hell-raiser; bootleg whiskey and fighting were his passions.  His mother thought the Oklahoma Military Academy might salvage him.  He loved horses and all things . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to...

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Payback for Pearl Harbor

I was recently visiting with an old Marine Corps buddy, Ralph Willis, at his home on California’s central coast.  At 86, he is one of the fortunate few who are still alive to describe their experiences fighting the Japanese in the Pacific during World War II.  Ralph put . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now...

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The Fighting Irish

Before a new documentary series on World War II by Ken Burns even aired on PBS, there was controversy.  Mexican-American organizations complained that there was no episode that focused solely on their people.  Burns responded by adding a segment devoted to Mexican-Americans.  Nonetheless, the same groups complained . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to...

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Submarine Ace of Aces

Now that the youngest of our World War II veterans, with but a few exceptions, are in their 80’s, I fear that, as they die, memory of them will die also.  While teaching history in college for more than 30 years—15 of those at UCLA, where a . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to...

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White Sprinters

For several years now, professional baseball has been pouring millions of dollars into developing black players.  Evidently, the number of black players, at least American blacks, has been in decline.  NASCAR is funding programs to develop black drivers after fielding complaints that the sport is too white.  Similarly, the . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe...

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Sex Slaves

By the 1950’s, professors at our universities were teaching American history, “warts and all.”  By the late 60’s, it was mostly warts.  Now, it is all warts, all the time. The Japanese have taken a different tack.  They have sanitized their history, especially their actions . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to access the...

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Clint Eastwood and Moral Equivalency

Since at least the late 60’s, there has been an effort in academe and in Hollywood to make all cultures morally equivalent.  More recently, there has been an effort to make “indigenous cultures”—whatever that means—morally superior to Western civilization.  I was thinking of all this when . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to access...

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“Scratch One Flattop”

It was America’s first naval battle of World War II, Japan’s first loss at sea in the war, the battle that saved Australia from a Japanese invasion, the greatest naval battle in Australian waters, the first carrier battle, and the first battle in which the opposing fleets . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to...

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Atrocities Azteca

Nearly every celebration of Mexican heritage by Mexicans in the United States now features references to the Aztecs and some form of traditional Aztec dance, called La Danza Azteca.  This would be something like the Irish celebrating Oliver Cromwell and the Cromwellian confiscations and settlement—only worse . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to access...

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Guadalcanal: An Emotion, Not a Name

In most history textbooks today, coverage of the war in the Pacific consists of a summary of the Battle of Midway, a brief mention of leapfrogging islands, and the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  The Battle of Midway is almost invariably described as the “turning point” in the . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe...

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The Saint of the Sourdoughs

More than 20 years ago, I presented a paper on the Old West at an historical conference and was surprised to find that I upset several female professors in the audience.  I had not disparaged their frontier sisters.  Quite the opposite: I described how strong, courageous, enterprising, and successful . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe...

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Black Sheep One

“Thou shalt not honor a white man,” says the first commandment of the politically correct—unless, of course, the white man in question is hastening the destruction of Western civilization or, perhaps, preserving the habitat of the pupfish.  A recent example of dishonoring an American hero occurred at the . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now...

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Zebra Killings

Whenever whites commit crimes against blacks, the dastardly deeds make headlines and are featured on nightly news programs.  The president wrings his hands and makes speeches about racism.  The Promise Keepers hug one another, cry, and confess to a newly minted transgression, the “sin of racism.”  Western Europeans look . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe...

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Foss’s Flying Circus

In the early 1960's, I was introduced to a fellow motorcycle rider by the name of Steve Foss. Before I could say anything, he quickly offered, "No relation to Joe Foss." He had anticipated my question and that of nearly everyone he had met for years back. For . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now...

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Japan’s Wars of Aggression

“Japan didn’t fight wars of aggression.  Only China now says so,” declared Yuko Tojo, the granddaughter of Japan’s wartime prime minister, Gen. Hideki Tojo, in an interview with the Japan Times in late June.  Yuko was half right.  Although Japan fought several wars of aggression . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to access the...

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Firebombing the Fatherland

While teaching at UCLA, I heard a student ask one of my teaching assistants why the United States dropped The Bomb on Japan and not on Germany.  The T.A. immediately responded, “Another example of racist America.”  A doctoral student, he did not seem to know that Germany surrendered . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now...

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A Hero Among Heroes

Ever since the late 1960’s, the cultural Marxists of academe have worked assiduously to destroy American heroes or simply to omit them from textbooks—and they have been largely successful.  As we approach the 60th anniversary of VE Day and VJ Day and the youngest of the World . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to...

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Red Over Black

For hundreds of years, perhaps thousands, the Indians of North America practiced slavery.  Until the 18th century, those enslaved, for the most part, were other Indians.  The tribes of the Pacific Northwest, for example, raided constantly, principally to secure slaves.  The populations of some villages were one-third slave . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now...

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Remember the Texas Revolution

“Chicano Studies” departments at American universities portray the Battle of the Alamo as the triumph of the lawful rulers of Texas over a rowdy, drunken band of illegal aliens.  Such a portrayal has a delicious irony to it, though it is mostly false.  Almost always omitted from the Chicano . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe...

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The Star Chamber

In 1975, the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) launched a campaign for reparations for those Japanese who had been forced to evacuate the West Coast during World War II.  A heavily financed lobbying effort came to fruition five years later when the House of Representatives passed a bill creating . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe...

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Whose Atrocities?

The Last Samurai is the latest movie to treat us to the spectacle of the U.S. Army slaughtering American Indian women and children.  Playing a disillusioned captain, Tom Cruise suffers from nightmares for his role in the dastardly deed.  He finds honor and redemption as a . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to access...

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California’s Mythologized Bandido

On the wintry morning of February 20, 1853, more than a hundred Chinese miners were working their claims near Rich Gulch.  Without warning, five mounted and gun-brandishing bandidos swept down upon the Chinese.  Taken by surprise and without arms themselves, the Chinese could do little but . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to access...

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Unit 731

Every time I ask my college students if they are familiar with Nazi atrocities, the collective reply is “Of course.”  Nearly all of them have also heard of Dr. Josef Mengele and his horrific medical experiments conducted at Auschwitz.  The “Angel of Death” has been the subject of countless . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe...

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Bury the Facts at Wounded Knee

At Wounded Knee Creek, on December 29, 1890, the last fight of any size or significance between the U.S. Army and American Indians occurred.  Although a terrible tragedy involving the loss of Indian women and children, the battle has been wildly mischaracterized, especially by those bent on making . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now...

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The Myth of Red Brotherhood

Second only to the myth of Indian as ecologist is that of red brotherhood.  Although physically similar, the Indian peoples of what is today the United States were a diverse lot.  There was no common language, culture, or identity.  A few groups of Indians evolved political organizations—the Iroquois . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now...

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The Modern Myth of the Black Cowboy

“Nigger Charley” Tyler rode the range of the Owens Valley in the trans-Sierra country of California during the early 1860’s.  He was one of the hired hands of the ranching McGee family, who grazed their beeves in the valley and then drove them north to market at . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to...

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American MAGIC and Japanese-American Spies

The competition for victim status is fierce in today’s America.  Considering their disproportionate degree of success here in the United States, it is ironic that, for the last several decades, Japanese-Americans have been engaged in that competition.  The relocation camps of World War II are now called . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to...

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Mexican in Name Only

For several years, Charles Truxillo, a professor at the University of New Mexico, has been proclaiming that the American Southwest will—and should—be reconquered by Mexico through massive immigration.  Most politicians and media have either ignored Truxillo or tried to characterize him as an isolated extremist, claiming that . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now to...

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In Remembrance of My Brothers

Three New York firefighters raise Old Glory over the rubble of the World Trade Center.  The dramatic moment is captured from afar by a photographer.  Within a day or two, the photo is featured in newspapers across the United States.  It becomes as recognizable as the Marine flag-raising . . . Subscribers Only Subscribe now...