Erik Von Kuehnelt-Leddihn

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The Iron Rod of American ‘Liberalism’
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The Iron Rod of American ‘Liberalism’

From the November 1988 issue of Chronicles.

In America, as in Britain, institutions, movements, political phenomena, historic events and geographic features have been given names and labels that bewilder and startle the rest of the world: the German “Westwall” of

Foreign Policy and the Popular Will
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Foreign Policy and the Popular Will

Is the foreign policy of the United States her Achilles’ heel and the cause of endless dissatisfaction? Without doubt, if we remember the words of Clausewitz: wars are nothing but the continuation of diplomacy by other means. Yet wars are

Utopias and Ideologies
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Utopias and Ideologies

People who “think ahead,” like Prometheus, have always constructed Utopias which are the outflow of their reflections and ideas—in other words, of their ideologies. On the other hand, most Americans who call themselves “conservatives” manifest a hostility towards ideologies and

The Iron Rod of American ‘Liberalism’
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The Iron Rod of American ‘Liberalism’

In America, as in Britain, institutions, movements, political phenomena, historic events and geographic features have been given names and labels that bewilder and startle the rest of the world: the German “Westwall” of World War II became the “Siegfried Line”

South Africa—Yesterday and Today
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South Africa—Yesterday and Today

“The trouble with people is not their ignorance.
It is the number of things they know that ain’t so.”

—Mark Twain

During 1986, the fury of the left’s outrage with human rights in Chile abated globally and was redirected against

The Empire At Europe’s End
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The Empire At Europe’s End

In the German name for Austria, Osterreich, Reich denotes more than “empire” in the sense of territorial extension; there is also a certain spiritual content. In the Middle Ages, empire meant the Eastern Roman Empire of Byzantium, and after

Trojan Asses
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Trojan Asses

“Then unbelieving Priests reform’d the nation,
And taught more pleasant methods of salvation.”

—Alexander Pope, An Essay on Criticism

On April 22, 1950, I published in the London Tablet an article entitled “The American Catholics Revisited,” which provoked an avalanche