Murray N. Rothbard

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Machine Politics

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From the December 1993 issue of Chronicles.

“Modern liberty begins in revolt.”
—H.M. Kallen

In 1943, in the midst of the dark years of World War II when collectivism seemed to be sweeping all before it at home and abroad,

Repudiating the Debt
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Repudiating the Debt

In the spring of 1981, conservative Republicans in the House of Representatives cried.  They cried because, in the first flush of the Reagan Revolution that was supposed to bring drastic cuts in taxes and government spending, as well as a

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Repudiating the National Debt

Before the Reagan era, conservatives were clear about how they felt about deficits and the public debt: a balanced budget was good, and deficits and the public debt were bad, piled up by free-spending Keynesians and socialists, who absurdly proclaimed

Sweet Land of Liberty
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Sweet Land of Liberty

I am deeply honored to receive the Richard Weaver Award, to stand in the ranks of the distinguished men who have received it, and to have an award in the name of a man who has always been one of

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Sanctions: War on the Cheap

The modern weapon of “sanctions” seems made-to-order for the foreign policy of Bill Clinton. Remarkably evasive and unprincipled even for a modern politician, Clinton is possessed of a horror of commitment in both his personal and his political life. The

Life in the Old Right
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Life in the Old Right

One problem with labeling ideological movements “old” or “new” is that inevitably, with the passage of time, the “new” becomes an “old” and the markers get confusing. In the modern, post-World War II right wing, there have been a number

Machine Politics
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Machine Politics

“Modern liberty begins in revolt.”
—H.M. Kallen

In 1943, in the midst of the dark years of World War II when collectivism seemed to be sweeping all before it at home and abroad, three fiercely independent and feisty women, all

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The Year of the Italian Nonwoman

It was late October, and my old friend was very depressed: “I’m not interested in any of these guys,” he said of all the presidential candidates. “I’m only interested in one thing in this election.” His voice grew warmer: “The

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The Saga of Esteban Solarz

Not long ago, during the glory days of the Gulf War, Stephen J. Solarz, ferret-faced little Democratic congressman from southern Brooklyn, was riding almost as high in the saddle as our Commander-in-Chief. For it was Solarz who played the major

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Twofold Question

Regarding Europe, I’ve got a nagging twofold question I’d love to have answered: Why has no one remarked on the incredible, glaring double standard in Establishment treatment of ex-Nazi and Communist regimes? And what in blazes is the justification for

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When Democracy Comes to Town

It was one of those political pundit panels on C-SPAN. Mona Charen, neoconservative columnist, was asked to sum up her experiences in the Kemp-for-President campaign in 1988. Miss Charen grew unwontedly misty-eyed: “The [democratic] process,” she sighed wistfully. “The process

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Repudiating the National Debt

In the spring of 1981, conservative Republicans in the House of Representatives cried. They cried because, in the first flush of the Reagan Revolution that was supposed to bring drastic cuts in taxes and government spending, as well as a

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Coping With Street Crime

Any cogent discussion of crime must begin by casting aside the obfuscations of criminologists and social scientists who habitually lump together all types of crime. But while most people can be made to wax indignant against fraud or against such

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The Long Hot Summer

July 18, 1991. The temperature was 99 degrees, the hottest day since the summer of 1988. The humidity, as usual, was stratospheric (undoubtedly the reason they stopped broadcasting the Temperature Humidity Index years ago). The hitherto unknown Coalition for

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Life Lessons

Academics have no more human frailties, I suppose, than are rampant in any other occupation. But those frailties are far more repellent, and far funnier, in a profession ostensibly dedicated to the disinterested search for truth.

1. The pettiness of

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In the Old Days

The Insensitivity Squad has struck again: this time against a board game and a marching band. Parker Brothers, venerable producer of board games, was recently denounced by the head of the U.S. Small Business Administration, left-Republican Susan Engeleiter. It seems

Affirmative Scholarship
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Affirmative Scholarship

“An excellent scholar! One that hath a head filled
with calves’ brains without any sage in it.”

—John Webster

Thomas Sowell has become a virtual one-man publishing industry, and Preferential Policies is his latest contribution to the Sowell book-of-the-year club.

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It Was a Long Hot Summer

I returned to New York at the end of May for my summer stint to find that both bellwethers of New York life, the far-out left Village Voice and the chic liberal New York, were headlining (respectively) “Race Rage,” and

Foreign Policy for the Post-Cold War World
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Foreign Policy for the Post-Cold War World

Nineteen eighty-nine was a year of great joy for lovers of freedom everywhere. For it was the “revolutionary” year in which totalitarian communism, throughout Eastern Europe and perhaps even in the Soviet Union itself, suddenly collapsed like a house of

That Infamous Diary
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That Infamous Diary

“Without the aid of prejudice and custom, I should
not be able to find my way across the room.”

—William Hazlitt

Rarely does a published diary, even of a celebrated writer, become anything more than fodder for the specialist.

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The Politics of Race

The politics of race—mayoral candidate Rudi Giuliani realized after the September 12 primary that to win as a Republican in a Democratic town like New York, he would have to get a large chunk of liberal and centrist Jews to