Joseph E Fallon

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Never-Ending War: An Economic Policy
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Never-Ending War: An Economic Policy

Contrary to the assertion of official historians, April 1865, which saw the fall of the Confederate States of America, was not the month in which the “Union” was saved or a “nation” was forged.  It was the month that saw

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The North’s Southern Cash Cow

Contrary to the claims of Marxism, economics does not determine the political structure of a country; rather, the political structure of a country determines its economic system.  The Soviet Union was proof of that.  In the case of the U.S.

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Afghanistan: The Road to Civilization

It is often said that “history repeats itself.” The recent history of Afghanistan confirms that view.  The scheduled withdrawal of U.S. military forces from Afghanistan in 2014 recalls the withdrawal of Soviet military forces from that country in 1989.  The

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Imperial Dusk

Whether it ends with a whimper or a bang, the American Empire is ending.  WikiLeaks shows that the empire can no longer control the dissemination of information.  Afghanistan, Somalia, and Yemen show it can no longer militarily defeat insurgencies. 

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China’s Future: Ascendency or Fragmentation?

As the American Empire declines, many see the People’s Republic of China, with its dynamic economy and powerful military, surpassing the United States and emerging as the new world power.  The reality is more complex, and China’s future more uncertain.

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Lincoln, the Antiwar Congressman

The only time before his presidency when Abraham Lincoln held national office was a single term (1847-49) in the U.S. House of Representatives.  During that time, while debating the Mexican-American War, Lincoln zealously defended the constitutional prerogative of Congress to

Lincoln and God
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Lincoln and God

Before the first shots were fired in the U.S. Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln had begun to style himself as an instrument of the Lord.  But as William H. Herndon, a law partner and Lincoln biographer, wrote, “[t]he very idea

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Pakistan: America’s Pandora’s Box?

On September 10, 2008,the New York Times reported that, back in July, President Bush had authorized ground incursions and missile attacks to destroy Taliban and Al Qaeda sanctuaries in Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas.  As the Times noted, “It

Lincoln, Diplomacy, and War
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Lincoln, Diplomacy, and War

In the tumultuous six months between his election in November 1860 and the outbreak of the Civil War in April 1861, Abraham Lincoln rejected all diplomatic efforts to resolve the deepening crisis peacefully.  In the political dispute with the newly

Sudan, Ethiopia, and the American Empire
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Sudan, Ethiopia, and the American Empire

Sudan and Ethiopia are neighboring countries that are both ruled by authoritarian regimes; each is engaged in a brutal counterinsurgency operation against rebel forces—the former, in Darfur; the latter, in Ogaden.  Curiously, these countries are treated quite differently by Washington;

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The New Plan for Iraq

When President Bush announced, in a televised speech, that he was planning to deploy 21,500 additional troops to Iraq, he added an ominous aside:

Succeeding in Iraq also requires defending its territorial integrity and stabilizing the region in the face

Lincoln’s Other War of Aggression
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Lincoln’s Other War of Aggression

Lincoln’s war against Southern independence is just one component of the American Civil War.  Like a Matryoshka doll, the Civil War opens up to reveal a set of nested wars, one inside another.  There is Lincoln’s war against international law;

Lincoln, the Leiber Code, and Total War
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Lincoln, the Leiber Code, and Total War

The American Civil War was an unparalleled tragedy for the United States and the world.  For it ensured that, thereafter, civilians everywhere were treated as “legitimate” targets in time of war.

As in all wars, the victor wrote the official

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Tipping Points and Imperial Meltdown

Tipping points have occurred in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Somalia that signal the beginning of a meltdown of the American Empire.

In war, a “tipping point” may be defined as an event so dramatic, often so unexpected, that it has a

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Neocons, Naxalites, and National Demise

The neoconservatives have promoted an aggressive U.S. foreign policy that they term “benevolent global hegemony.”  In other words, they demand, to paraphrase Pat Buchanan, “an empire, not a republic.”

What makes the American Empire an unprecedented historical phenomenon—the one instance

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The Neo-Ottoman Empire

Contrary to Washington’s official rhetoric, the U.S. government is an ally, not an opponent, of Islamic extremism—a foe, not a defender, of Western civilization.

Not since the Turkish siege of Vienna (1526) has Europe faced the threat of a

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Woodrow Wilson and America’s World Empire

Twenty-first century America is the creation of President Woodrow Wilson, who used the messianic ideology of American Exceptionalism (the belief that America is unique and morally superior to other countries) and the opportunity afforded by World War I to turn

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The American Myth of World War I

In 1917, two revolutions engulfed war-ravaged Europe.  The first was America’s military intervention in France on June 26, which prolonged World War I and, thus, made possible the second: the communist seizure of power in Russia on November 7.

To

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Lincoln and the Death of the Old Republic

Official history venerates Abraham Lincoln as an apostle of American democracy who waged war on the South to preserve the Union and free the slaves.  Official history is a lie.

Lincoln was a dictator who destroyed the Old Republic and

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Power, Legitimacy, and the 14th Amendment

The justification for the vast, intrusive, and coercive powers employed by the government of the United States against its citizens—from affirmative action to hate-crimes legislation, from multilingualism to multiculturalism, from Waco to Ruby Ridge—is the 14th Amendment to the U.S.

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The Dangerous Myth of American Exceptionalism

One thing that distinguishes the French from the Americans is that the French have the good grace to number their failed political experiments—two kingdoms, two empires, and five republics.

Americans, on the other hand, profess “American exceptionalism.” They assert that

Fighting the Big War
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Fighting the Big War

“What did you do in the big war?” his grandchildren asked. Ralph Walker Willis has answered them in My Life as a Jarhead: USMC 1941-45, a valuable book for anyone interested in the subjects of history and heroism. His

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A Heated Topic

The Confederate Flag has become a heated topic this election year. As George W. Bush and John McCain battled in South Carolina for the Republican presidential nomination, the New York Young Republican Club invited Richard Lowry, the editor of National

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Territorial Bliss

One consequence of the Cold War has gone unnoticed. Before the Berlin Wall fell and the Soviet Union collapsed, the United States had already ceased to exist. To fight the Cold War and in the name of national security, Washington

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Clinton’s Nominee

Richard Holbrooke is President Clinton’s nominee to replace Bill Richardson as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. This nomination stems from Holbrooke’s role in imposing the Dayton Accords on Bosnia and Clinton’s desire to exploit such interventions to convert the

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The Politics of Illegitimacy Rates

Since the early 1960’s, compiling statistics on illegitimacy rates in the United States has been the official responsibility of the National Center for Health Statistics. However, the methodology employed by that federal agency to determine illegitimacy rates according to race

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The Censored History of Internment

In March 1997, Japanese-Peruvians who had been interned in the United States during World War II called upon President Clinton to issue an executive order awarding them financial compensation similar to that awarded in 1988 to Japanese-American former internees and

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The Politics of Hispanic Identity

The federal government officially recognizes “Hispanic”—an artificial and arbitrary concept devoid of ethnic, racial, cultural, or linguistic meanings—as a legitimate collective identity for two reasons. Domestically, it is to create a “Hispanic nation” within the United States, to inflate the

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The Politics of Hate Crime Statistics

The FBI’s “Hate Crime Statistics”—preliminary figures for 1995 were released in November—are highly suspect because of the agency’s flawed methodology. The problem is that, in recording and identifying the perpetrators of hate crimes, there are no strictly defined categories