William Hawkins

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Shattering North America

When President George W. Bush, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper, and Mexican President Felipe Calderón met in Quebec in mid-August, they were greeted by news stories that had migrated into the mainstream media from the populist fringe, alleging that the

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A COM For Africa

Ryan Henry, principal deputy under secretary of defense for policy, held a briefing on April 23 about the future opening of the new Africa Command (AFRICOM).  It will join other U.S. commands that coordinate military and interagency operations for the

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Giving America Priority in Trade Policy

As the global-trade establishment becomes more insulated from the growing criticism of people still rooted in their  native soil, it is missing the turn in world events that is frustrating its efforts.  Examples abound.  The latest round of trade-liberalization negotiations

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Opposing CFIUS

Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL) received a letter on March 23 from a gaggle of organizations representing the financial industry.  The group included the American Bankers Association, the Bankers’ Association for Finance and Trade, the Investment Company Institute, the Securities Industry

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The Price of Oil

Oil prices have been soaring, yet the U.S. media has overlooked one of the chief reasons why.  The 2005 Department of Defense report on “The Military Power of the People’s Republic of China” cites Beijing’s growing need for foreign sources

The Rise of China
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The Rise of China

Anyone who doubts that China is rising fast as the new power in Asia need only take the ride I took last fall through Shanghai, from the Hongqiao International Airport to the Bund area along the Huangpu riverfront.  It was

The Myth of an Antiglobalist Left
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The Myth of an Antiglobalist Left

As I write, Washington has just been subjected to a weekend of left-wing protests that even the conservative-oriented Washington Times estimated brought 500,000 demonstrators to the nation’s capital.  The March for Women’s Lives, with its shrill advocacy of abortion, overshadowed

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Soaring Gas Prices

Gas prices are above two dollars per gallon, making the antiwar chant “no blood for oil” sound even more naive than usual.  Gasoline prices in Europe and Japan are, as usual, running more than twice American prices.

According to research

How the World Works
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How the World Works

As an economics professor, I taught from the Chicago School scripture about the superiority of private business over any contending sector of society.  I could never teach so naively again after spending almost a decade observing the Washington legislative

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A Serious Competitor

China’s first manned space mission should serve as a warning that Beijing is serious about becoming a “peer competitor” of the United States.  Some commentators mocked the Chinese effort as being far behind the achievements of the U.S. space program. 

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American Economy

The WTO talks in Cancun, Mexico, and their ultimate collapse were similar to what happened in Seattle in 1999, when President Bill Clinton, an avowed “free trader,” walked out when faced with demands even he could not stomach.  Four years

Nations Still Count in a Globalized World
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Nations Still Count in a Globalized World

At the end of every major period of international strife since at least the Seven Years War, the claim has been put forth that a New World Order has finally arrived that makes possible the substitution of commerce for geopolitics

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On the Shoulders of Giants?

The Arts and Entertainment (A&F) television network, best known for its Biography series, has produced a list of the 100 most important figures of the millennium and devoted four hours of airtime to explain its picks. The list consists mainly

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Deployments in Kosovo

American troop deployments in Kosovo were the subject of a debate in the House of Representatives on March 11. A resolution authorizing President Clinton to contribute U.S. ground troops to a NATO peacekeeping mission in the troubled province was supported

The Secrets of Liberalism
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The Secrets of Liberalism

        “A secret may be sometimes best kept by keeping the secret of its being a secret.”
—Henry Taylor

I was reading his new book when Daniel Patrick Moynihan announced that he would not seek a fourth Senate term in 2000.

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NAFTA Approved

NAFTA was approved by Congress in November 1993. That year, the United States had a $1.6 billion trade surplus with Mexico, down from $5.7 billion the year before. The proponents of the new agreement argued that the “opening” of Mexico

The Lady From Niger
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The Lady From Niger

“There once was a lady from Niger Who smiled as she rode on a tiger. They returned from the ride With the lady inside And the smile on the face of the tiger.”
—Ogden Nash

Christopher Patten warns at the

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Bipartisan “Nationalist” Coalition

The Bipartisan “nationalist” coalition which has been emerging in response to the cosmopolitan policies of the Clinton administration scored several notable victories in the week before Congress adjourned for 1997. The House defeated an attempt to extend NAFTA to the

Big Emerging Mistakes
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Big Emerging Mistakes

The theory that “big emerging markets” (BEMs) m the Third Worid will be the driving force of the world economy, and thus of worid politics, has been at the core of the Clinton administration’s foreign policy. As Undersecretary of Commerce

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Declaring China “Normal”

The annual process of extending “most-favored-nation” (MFN) trade status to communist China was to have a new twist this year. Beijing’s friends in Washington were pushing for an end to this embarrassing review of Beijing’s brutal behavior by granting MFN

It’s Sovereignty, Stupid!
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It’s Sovereignty, Stupid!

On March 18, President Bill Clinton tested the waters on the foreign trade issue. These waters had been heated up by Republican contender Patrick Buchanan’s attacks on “unfair trade deals,” which had hurt Americans for the benefit of transnational corporations.

Social Engineering in the Balkans
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Social Engineering in the Balkans

In his November 27 televised speech explaining his rationale for sending United States troops into the Balkans, President Bill Clinton said his goal is “preserving Bosnia as a single state.” Testifying three days later before the House National Security Committee,

The Surrender of Political and Military Sovereignty
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The Surrender of Political and Military Sovereignty

Sovereignty is a people’s ability to govern its internal affairs and protect its independence against outside interference. Military power has always been the most obvious pillar of sovereignty. Clausewitz’ dictum that the object of war is “to compel your opponent

The American Churchill
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The American Churchill

While reading this wide-ranging collection, I was struck once again by the similarities between Theodore Roosevelt and Winston Churchill. Both were prolific writers of books and essays that incorporate history and political thought with personal experience. And while the prime

The People at War
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The People at War

“The wars of peoples will be more X terrible than the wars of kings!” So predicted the young Winston Churchill as the new century dawned in 1901. The world wars (two hot, one cold) that have marked the decades since

The Retreat From Realism
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The Retreat From Realism

The essence of conservatism is realism. Conservatives properly study the bloody lessons of history and recognize the ambiguous temper of human nature. They reject the grand but unworkable schemes for radical reform proposed by the socialist left. They favor local

Roots of a New World Order
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Roots of a New World Order

Though Thomas Knock draws no explicit comparisons between Woodrow Wilson’s plans for a post- Great War world and the policies George Bush tried to fashion for a post-Cold War world, his use of the term “New World Order” in the

Let Them Eat Brie
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Let Them Eat Brie

The Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy (BRIE) has been in the forefront in devising the new paradigm of strategic trade and industrial policy. This set of essays by BRIE members articulates the group’s view of how the major national

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Key Issue

Ron Brown was recently blasted by an organ that is usually quite friendly to Democrats, the New York Times. Its editorial page blasted Brown’s confirmation hearing for Commerce Secretary as a “bipartisan disgrace,” claiming it “amounted to an open

The New Imperialism
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The New Imperialism

The terms “global economy” and “New World Order” have become part of the common litany that frames foreign policy discussions. Though the second term is often used in a mocking or ironic tone, the first has attained the status of

The Democratic Trajectory
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The Democratic Trajectory

It is common in liberal and neoconservative circles to argue that the United States should foster democracy around the world to enhance its own security because “democracies don’t fight each other.” At the same time, more traditional conservative critics call

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Additional Reductions

President Bush’s 1993 budget called for additional reductions in defense spending totaling $50 billion over five years. Liberal members of Congress immediately sharpened their knives to make even larger cuts. Bush’s recommendations in regard to nuclear weapons were sensible. Termination

The Anti-Americans
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The Anti-Americans

This latest installment in Paul Hollander’s series of exposes of left-liberal thinking has a broader perspective than his previous work. His first book, Political Pilgrims, and subsequent writings focused on the affinity of Western liberals for communist states vis-a-vis

Talking Brass
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Talking Brass

I remember having dinner with John Singlaub shortly after he retired from the Army. The Young Americans for Freedom chapter at the University of Tennessee, of which I was president, had invited him to speak on campus. Singlaub had gained

Yellow Peril (Part II)
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Yellow Peril (Part II)

Do not be put off by the sensationalist title. This is a solid geopolitical and economic study of power in the Pacific during the 20th century. Basing their prophesy on the record, George Friedman and Meredith Lebard conclude that a

Win or Lose
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Win or Lose

When Desert Storm commander General Norman Schwarzkopf thanked President Bush for letting the military fight the Gulf war on its own terms, he was expressing an idea deeply felt in the Pentagon for over twenty years: “No more Vietnams.” Both

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Aliens and the Alienated

American leftists today yearn for a more receptive proletariat. They have virtually given up on the white working class, which they feel has been subverted by bourgeois values and the consumer society. Instead they have turned towards people of non-European

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The Sun Never Sets

An Anglo-Indian force of 24,000 men under General Sir Hugh Cough attacked a Sikh army of 52,000 at Gujarat in the Punjab on February 21, 1849. In the words of Byron Farwell, the Sikhs had “a splendid army. Its equipment

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A Logical Choice

Machiavelli, in answer to the question of whether a prince should prefer gold or arms, replied that arms were the logical choice since gold could not always buy a strong military but a strong military could usually acquire wealth. This

Tuition for America
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Tuition for America

“Commerce is a perpetual and peaceable war of wit and energy among the nations” wrote the 17th-century French statesman Jean Baptiste Colbert. He likened his Grandes Compagnies, state chartered trading companies, to “armies” attacking the economic foundations of rival

Open Doors, Open Questions
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Open Doors, Open Questions

“Many believe that the country is overextended and should reduce its external commitments. But in a world of growing interdependence among nations, this advice is the wrong answer, and U.S. decline is the wrong question.” So Joseph Nye begins his

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Budgetary Issues

The fiscal 1991 budget proposed by President Bush totaled some $1.2 trillion. This prodigious amount, larger than the entire Gross National Product of twenty years ago, is considered a “tight budget” in Washington. Politicians complain that they cannot find enough

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The Incredible Lightness of Being Liberal

John Taft’s book is a history of American foreign policy from World War I through the Vietnam War, as exemplified by the careers of prominent “liberal internationalists” who dominated the policymaking process: William Bullit, Averell Harriman, George Kennan, Chester Bowles,

Whose Wealth of Whose Nation?
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Whose Wealth of Whose Nation?

“Then the Gods of the Market tumbled, and their smooth-tongued wizards withdrew,
And the hearts of the meanest were humbled and began to believe it was true
That All is not Gold that Glitters, and Two and Two make Four—

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Trade Surplus Nation

A trade surplus nation for the century before the 1980’s, the US had been the world’s leading industrial power since 1900 and a net creditor since World War I. The apparent reversal of all of these positions in less than

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Soviet Strategy

“He crucified noble, he sacrificed mean,

He filled old ladies with kerosene.

While over the waters the papers cried

‘The patriot fights for his countryside!'”

—Rudyard Kipling,
“The Ballad of Boh da thone”  

 

For 40 years two topics have dominated

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National Insecurity

“Diplomacy is utterly useless where there is no force behind it.”
—Theodore Roosevelt

From the elevation of arms control to the opening of talks with the PLO, the course of American foreign policy in recent years has led some to