Eugene Girin

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With Friends Like These
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With Friends Like These

The elegantly titled Iron Wall is a perfect example of how a necessary book on an important topic can be rendered inadequate by the author’s all-consuming bias.  In the Preface to this immense volume, Avi Shlaim, a retired professor at

Royalism and Reaction
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Royalism and Reaction

After publishing highly acclaimed biographies of Zola and Flaubert, the New York City-based Frederick Brown established himself as an expert on French cultural and intellectual life with his magnificent book For the Soul of France, a saga of the

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The Wisdom of Old Rabinovich

Indiana’s shameful surrender to the Gay Mafia, Big Business, the Left, and the Commentariat on the Religious Freedom Restoration Act came as no surprise. Indeed, Pat Buchanan’s most recent column on the whole sorry debacle contains words that must be

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The Unsinkable Bibi Netanyahu

The recent Israeli Knesset elections surprised the world by returning Benjamin Netanyahu and his Likud party to power. The resounding win put Netanyahu on the path to becoming the longest serving PM in Israeli history and caused some consternation and

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Whisk(e)y: An Appreciation

I used to have a test for when an immigrant is truly Americanized (if such a thing is possible these days): When he starts liking football as much or more than soccer. I reached that point almost five years ago,

Annus Horribilis
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Annus Horribilis

The centennial of that enormous calamity later known as World War I saw the release of about a dozen books on the subject.  Catastrophe 1914, by Sir Max Hastings, one of the foremost British military historians writing today, is

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Fifty Shades of Dreck or Homage to a Psychopath

The bestselling Fifty Shades trilogy by E.L. James (pen name of British authoress Erika Mitchell), which includes the books Fifty Shades of Grey, Fifty Shades Shades Darker, and Fifty Shades Free became the latest fad in the shabby

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Netanyahu and “European” Antisemitism

The most recent Muslim terrorist outrage took place in Copenhagen this time. The son of Palestinian immigrants (the European liberals’ favorite designated victims) Omar Abdel Hamid El-Hussein (described with typical accuracy by the NYT as Denmark’s “native son”) shot up

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A Valentine’s Day Reflection

A year or so ago, I discovered the work of Czech author Karel Capek who died on the eve of World War II. He was very popular in Eastern Europe and is barely known in the West. Most famous for

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Reading The London Spectator in Kishinev

In segments of the black community, particularly among the urban poor, being pursued by the police is a badge of honour, a sign that you have stood up to ‘the man’. Many black voters in Washington thought the police entrapped

Dealing With the Devil
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Dealing With the Devil

Ralph Sarchie exudes an aura of intense strength when he walks into a room.  A fit, middle-aged man with heavily tattooed arms (pictures of his daughters and tough cop tattoos, like one that reads New York Untouchables) and a buzz

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The Brooklyn Museum and the Triumph of Non-Art

In the current issue of Chronicles Thomas Fleming writes:

Surrealists, communists, and Dadaists did not merely embrace the death of meaning and civility; they positively exulted in the death of the West and everything Western. They hated Christianity, especially

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What MLK Day Says About Today’s America

In one of his most famous quotes, Winston Churchill described Russia as “a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma.” Today’s America could be described as a country led by a plagiarist, with the help of another plagiarist, which

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Muslim Terrorism in Paris

Muslim Terrorism in Paris, Michel Houellebecq’s Cowardice, and the Islamization of France: An Interview with Russian writer Elena Choudinova, author of The Notre Dame de Paris Mosque.

Translated from Russian by Eugene Girin

Eugene Girin: Elena, you are

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Pope Francis: Man of the Year?

In the midst of the cold war declared by the NYPD against our ultra-liberal mayor, the hot wars in Ukraine, Syria, and Iraq, I could not help but notice a well-written and hard-hitting piece by traditionalist Catholic attorney Christopher Ferrara

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Christmas and New Year’s With Chronicles

For the last couple of years, this poor little Jewish boy (to paraphrase Taki) has a tradition. Every Christmas, I like to read a novella or a story (with a glass or two or three of spiced wine) that puts

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Eric Garner Case: The Score

Recently, the Big Burrito erupted into protests after Italian-American Police Officer Daniel Pantaleo was cleared by a grand jury of all criminal responsibility in the death of Black man Eric Garner who died after being allegedly held in a banned

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Mi General: Defending Augusto Pinochet at CUNY

Part of being a paleoconservative is facing down hostile remarks and insults by the usual suspects of the Left and the neocon Right. Aside from the ubiquitous “racist” (defined by VDARE’s Peter Brimelow as “someone who’s winning an argument with

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Witnessing Anarcho-Tyranny

In this month’s issue, Dr. Fleming discusses anarcho-tyranny, Sam Francis’ term for “our bizzare criminal justice system that combines ‘anarchy (the failure of the state to enforce the laws)’ and ‘tyranny – the enforcement of laws by the state for

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NYC: A Second Amendment-Free Zone, Part II

Last week I wrote about the tedious process one needs to go through in order to obtain a shotgun/rifle license in the Big Burrito. The passive aggressive bureaucratic roadblocks such as the co-habitant permission requirement, are surely a violation of

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NYC: A Second Amendment-Free Zone, Part I

The Big Burrito (formerly known as the Big Bagel) is infamous for its harsh restrictions on legal firearm ownership. To legally own a handgun in the five boroughs, a mere civilian, with no background in law enforcement, needs to jump

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Confronting Hostage Takers: A Record of Cowardice

The beheading of American journalist Steven Sotloff by ISIS led to outraged declarations by this country’s leaders. “When people harm Americans, we don’t retreat, we don’t forget. We take care of those who are grieving. And when that is finished,

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How to Deal With Hostage Takers: Soviet Lessons

The recent videotaped beheadings of American journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff by the bloodthirsty savages of ISIS bring to mind a story which took place in Lebanon almost 30 years ago. On September 30, 1985, a group of gunmen

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A Europe of Mohammeds

According to Norway’s The Local English-language news website, Mohammed became the most common male name in Oslo, surpassing Jan and Per, which are in the second and third spots respectively. Apparently, for the last four years in a row, Mohammed

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The Madmen of Benghazi

French author and unabashed rightwinger Gerard De Villiers who passed away last fall at the age of 84 was hardly a household name in this country. The former journalist who became a spy novelist was famous for his 200 pulp

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Assyrian Genocide: Ongoing and Forgotten

The recent massacres and expulsions of Iraqi Christians are only the latest chapter in the genocide of the ancient and exclusively Christian Assyrians, a continuation of the bloody campaign that took place in the Ottoman Empire, Persia, and Iraq throughout

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Fear and Loathing in Ferguson

The recent riots in majority-black Ferguson, Missouri have seized the attention of the world. Eighteen-year-old Michael Brown, universally described by the media as an “unarmed Black teenager” was shot and killed by a police officer. According to the police, he

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Summer Reading, Part III

The last three summers (2011-2013), I indulged in a genre of books, which my Catholic friends found to be curious. As longtime Chronicles reader and fellow New York attorney Fred Kelly said: “You have an interesting reading list for a

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In Nomine Lenin

This week brought the unpleasant, but not surprising news that Pope Francis reinstated as priest one Miguel D’Escoto Brockmann (the latter is his mother’s maiden name, added to his surname as customary in Spanish-speaking countries) who served as foreign minister

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Summer Reading, Part II

After coming back from magnificent (unless you’re talking about the food), yet woefully underrated Prague in late August of 2008, I immediately read Jaroslav Hasek’s The Good Soldier Švejk, a satirical novel based on the misadventures of a Falstaffian

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Summer Reading, Part I

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Some people can trace the stages of their life by the liquor they drink or the clothing style they adopt. Being very ecumenical when it comes to liquor, I prefer to trace the events of my life by the books

Unshattered
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Unshattered

Admittedly, I approached Amanda Bell with a degree of caution.  I am, to say the least, wary of fiction, especially fiction centered around a female protagonist who is on a path of self-understanding and realization.  The soppy novels of an

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The Zoophiles of Gaza

A video, reportedly shot by an Israeli drone over the war-torn Gaza Strip has been circulating on various social networks. The footage shows several Hamas fighters, decked out in kuffiya headscarves, having sexual intercourse with a goat or a sheep.

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“French” youths strike again

Living in Forest Hills, a predominantly Jewish part of Queens (Simon and Garfunkel, the Ramones, and Jerry Seinfeld all grew up here), I have a fairly good sense of the both liberal American and rightwing Soviet Jewish opinion. Israel’s Gaza

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Rome

Finally home, albeit without luggage, which is stuck either in Rome, Milan, or somewhere in between. But what can one expect from an industry, which sends people to their deaths over a war-torn region in collusion with the EU/State Department

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Florence

We arrived to Florence on early Monday afternoon and stayed till about 12 pm today. The city of Dante was an unforgettable experience, the crowds of Chinese tourists notwithstanding. (There were so many of them in Florence, that in a

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Bergamo

On Sunday, we went to Bergamo – north Italy’s hidden jewel and one of the prettiest places I have ever been to. Having been advised to visit it by both Dr. Fleming and Dr. Trifkovic, I spent some time convincing

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Venice

Saturday, we went on a day trip to Venice (I could hear Andrei Navrozov chuckling all the way from Sicily). Truth be told, I was very hesitant to go to Venice this time of the year after being advised of

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Milan, Part II

Today, was certainly a more relaxed day here in the city of St. Ambrose and Silvio Berlusconi. After getting acquainted with the tram routes (Milan’s subways are few and far in between), we got off at the Duomo square. (I

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Italy Travelogue, I: Milan

Arrived today on a direct flight from JFK airport for the first stop in my Italian vacation: Milan. Famous more for its soccer teams and companies than for historic sites, Milan is a convenient first stop because of the abundance

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Montenegrin Church Fresco: Tito in Hell

Cathedral

The old Serbian joke goes like this. An elderly Serb peasant invites his friends over for some drinks and they notice that the crucifix on the wall of his hut is positioned between two portraits: one of Stalin and the

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A Young Attorney’s Lament: Law School

Attorneys love to talk.  They are addicted to argument, storytelling, reminiscing.  The latter is especially true, both of weathered courtroom veterans, with their salt-and-pepper beards and passé suits, and of eager novices with their bright paisley ties and the slightest

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Why Ann Coulter Is Dead Wrong About Soccer

Ann Coulter’s recent article “America’s Favorite National Pastime: Hating Soccer” is two things. First, it is an example of that shrill uncouthness that Europeans like to attribute to Americans, an obnoxious boorishness that is typical behavior for those jerks, which

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World Cup Reflections

Here in New York City, you do not have even go online or turn on the TV to find out which team won one of the day’s three first round matches in the World Cup. You just go out of

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Taking Ecumenism Too Far

Pope Francis’ visit to the Holy Land had a few tense moments. First, he prayed at the graffiti-covered separation barrier (nicknamed the “Apartheid Wall” by the Palestinians and their Western leftist supporters) between the Palestinian Authority and Israel. Then, he