Jerry D. Salyer

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Books in Brief: July 2021
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Books in Brief: July 2021

Who Is My Neighbor? An Anthology in Natural Relations, by Thomas Achord and Darrell Dow (584 pp., $24.99). The headmaster of a classical Christian school has teamed up with a statistician to collect and sort thousands of quotations pertaining

Books in Brief: Catholic and Identitarian
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Books in Brief: Catholic and Identitarian

Catholic & Identitarian, by Julien Langella (Arktos Media; 338 pp., $38.95). French commando Dominique Venner committed suicide inside Notre-Dame Cathedral in 2013 as an act of protest against unrestricted Islamic immigration. One cannot but censure Venner’s sacrilegious act. Yet,

Books in Brief: February 2021
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Books in Brief: February 2021

Catholic & Identitarian, by Julien Langella (Arktos Media; 338 pp., $38.95). French commando Dominique Venner committed suicide inside Notre-Dame Cathedral in 2013 as an act of protest against unrestricted Islamic immigration. One cannot but censure Venner’s sacrilegious act. Yet,

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Let’s Stop Equating Slavery and Abortion

Frequently, pro-life leaders draw a parallel between slavery and abortion. “You Say Abortion Is Legal? The Supreme Court Also Legalized Slavery,” reads one popular bumper sticker. The motivation for this comparison is understandable, since slavery and the Civil War occupy

Nationalism: More to Learn
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Nationalism: More to Learn

However much they may enjoy watching Captain von Trapp sing “Edelweiss” in The Sound of Music, most Catholic intellectuals nowadays are squeamish about delving too deeply into the production’s historical background.  Such reticence is hardly surprising, for in Von

Letter From Kentucky: Covington and the Cannibals
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Letter From Kentucky: Covington and the Cannibals

Having mistakenly thought that he had killed his rival during a fight over a girl, 16-year old Simon Kenton headed west from Virginia into Kentucky. Before he turned 20 Kenton had established himself as a first-rate ranger and Indian fighter,

Know Patria, Know Patriotism
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Know Patria, Know Patriotism

With Independence Day festivities approaching, Chronicles readers may be interested in a public lecture about patriotism which I gave in Louisville this past year. It has always seemed to me that before we can begin to intelligently discuss border control,

Latin, The Language of the West
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Latin, The Language of the West

For generations Latin was the backbone of Christian civilization, and served as the basis for political, intellectual, and religious discourse during the most creative periods of European history. And, as a number of scholars have pointed out, the relatively recent

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What Mean Ye By These Stones?

Following the 1862 battle at Perryville, the angry Unionists who held the Kentucky town declined to bury their slain foes.  When the stench and sight of wild hogs gorging themselves on corpses finally proved unbearable, the task of laying the

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Leftists, Creationists, and Useful Idiots

Not everyone here in the Bluegrass State was delighted by the 2007 opening of the Creation Museum in Boone County.  “There’s been such a push in recent years to improve science education,” a representative of the Kentucky Paleontology Society gloomily

War on Louisville—or War on Kentucky?
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War on Louisville—or War on Kentucky?

In one corner, there is Kentucky’s upbeat governor, whose attractive wife, five biological children, and four adopted children compose a family too large to fit into the traditional governor’s mansion.  New England-bred Matthew Bevin speaks out for religious freedom, promotes

Silicon Hillbilly
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Silicon Hillbilly

“Breathitt County in east Kentucky is the only county in the United States not to have had selective service enforced during the Second World War.  That was because there were so many volunteers.”

—Gordon McKinney

Since I have long been

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Success and Failure in Higher Education

Nelson County, Marion County, and Washington County are collectively referred to by their inhabitants as the Kentucky Holy Land, and I don’t think the expression is meant to be entirely whimsical.  Settled in the late 18th century by English Catholics

A Reluctant Revolutionary
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A Reluctant Revolutionary

Wendell Berry is a Democrat, pacifist, and critic of organized religion.  Add to this the fact that he is a writer whose work has proved compelling to many conservatives, and he becomes a bit mysterious.  At times Berry himself has

No Piety, No Justice
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No Piety, No Justice

“Human rights are not isolated, private, and ‘at war’ with each other,” explained Sue Ellen Browder, former journalist for Cosmopolitan and author of Subverted: How I Helped the Sexual Revolution Hijack the Women’s Movement.  “Human rights are indivisible.”  The

The Relevance of Russian Tradition
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The Relevance of Russian Tradition

My first exposure to Alexander Dugin came via YouTube, when I discovered Vladimir Pozner’s 2014 interview with the controversial theorist.  Marred somewhat by cultural relativism, Dugin’s critique of Anglo-American empire nonetheless contained more depth than a year’s supply of the

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After Strange Gods

In Hungary last October, U.S. diplomat André Goodfriend noted that Americans’ “right to express their views would be protected under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.”  Making clear that his sympathies lay not with U.S. citizens arrested in Budapest

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Six of One

Since his election to the Senate in 1984, Mitch McConnell has been the bête noir of Kentucky progressives.  Like Halley’s comet, the slogan “Ditch Mitch” has appeared again and again, and McConnell’s adversaries have made a recurring cathartic ritual of

Underground Man
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Underground Man

Was it fair of Solzhenitsyn to call Peter the Great “a mediocre man, if not a barbarian”?  I honestly don’t know.  What I do know is that history didn’t begin with the Cold War, and that long before Solzhenitsyn, renowned

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Suspicious Minds

Will Russian philosophy gain a foothold in Russia?  It already has, laments David Brooks in a New York Times op-ed (“Putin Can’t Stop,” March 3).  Brooks finds disturbing Vladimir Putin’s tendency to quote the likes of Nikolai Berdyaev, Vladimir Soloviev,

Where the Demons Dwell: The Antichrist Right
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Where the Demons Dwell: The Antichrist Right

Those blissfully ignorant of right-wing soap opera will have never noticed the Antichrist Right, a loose coalition of writers who regard the Church as the worst thing that ever happened to Western civilization.  If I understand correctly, the Antichrist Right

Living Communally
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Living Communally

At first, our taxi driver asserts that the United States will surely triumph overseas—thanks to the teams of dedicated, patriotic geniuses who diligently work in the field of American foreign policy.

On second thought, he wryly reflects, the Soviet Union