Author: Wayne Allensworth (Wayne Allensworth)

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Nothing to See Here, Move Along

As Steve Sailer says, you aren’t supposed to notice some things—like rising mortality rates for middle aged, working class whites that I discussed last week: A startling new study that shows a big spike in the death rate for a large group of middle-aged whites in the United States was rejected by two prestigious medical journals, the study’s co-author,...

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White Privilege in Action

Mortality rates for middle aged white Americans are rising, as reported by the New York Times: “Something startling is happening to middle-aged white Americans. Unlike every other age group, unlike every other racial and ethnic group, unlike their counterparts in other rich countries, death rates in this group have been rising, not falling. That finding...

Playing the Trump Card
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Playing the Trump Card

In August, the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) published a report documenting a startling increase in immigration over the past year.  The study indicated that America’s immigrant population had grown by 1.7 million and that 44 percent of the new immigrants were from Mexico, with illegal immigration increasing during a “protracted period of legal immigration...

Manual Control
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Manual Control

Russian political analyst Vladimir Pastukhov once wrote that state power, or vlast, and not law “holds a sacred status in Russia.”  Russians, according to Pastukhov, experience state power as a “mystical entity,” a “life giving substance,” a “deity” in its own right, from whom, in times of trouble, the narod (the people) expects answers. Anna...

A Long Time Gone
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A Long Time Gone

        “How shall we sing the Lord’s songin a strange land?” —Psalm 137:4        “[Man] has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance.  The poet’s, the writer’s, duty is to write about these things.  It is his privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart,...

An American Tragedy
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An American Tragedy

American Sniper has generated more commentary, both scathingly critical and laudatory, than any film in recent memory.  The story of “America’s deadliest sniper,” Texas-born and -bred Navy SEAL Chris Kyle (credited with more than 160 “confirmed” kills), himself shot down in 2013 by a disturbed war veteran he was trying to help, has become a...

Obama’s Manufactured Border Crisis
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Obama’s Manufactured Border Crisis

This summer’s border crisis—the near total collapse of any controls or security at our southern border, especially in South Texas—was manufactured by the Obama administration as a means of forcing through a mass amnesty, either via Congress or by executive fiat.  Legalizing millions of illegal aliens now resident in these United States is the immediate...

Silver or Lead: The Reverse Assimilation of the Southwest
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Silver or Lead: The Reverse Assimilation of the Southwest

Texas attorney general and gubernatorial candidate Greg Abbot committed what is commonly called a political gaffe earlier this year when he said what every thinking person this side of the Rio Grande already knew: Mass immigration from Mexico means the importation of Mexican corruption and the steady erosion of law and social trust that too...

The Con Man
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The Con Man

“The more identities a man has, the more they express the person they conceal.” —John le Carré, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy   Fifty years ago, The Spy Who Came in From the Cold completed the most successful transformation of David Cornwell’s shape-shifting life.  The son of a war profiteer and con man became John le...

The Brothers Tsarnaev: Assimilating Terrorists
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The Brothers Tsarnaev: Assimilating Terrorists

Tamerlan Tsarnaev’s widow is no longer calling herself “Karima Tsarnaeva.”  She is Katherine Russell again.  Karima/Katherine is reportedly drifting away from the way of life she accepted when she converted to Islam and married the Boston Bomber, the terrorist killed by police last April following the bombings that left three dead and wounded as many...

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Welcoming Terrorists, Locking Down Citizens

Terrorist bombings that killed 3 and wounded and maimed over 260 at the finish line of the Boston Marathon on April 15 prompted the militarized “lockdown” of an American city for days, as police in full combat gear took part in a massive manhunt that may have given us a glimpse of our future. As...

Giving Up, Giving In
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Giving Up, Giving In

“But what if Juárez is not a failure?  What if it is closer to the future that beckons all of us from our safe streets and Internet cocoons?” —Charles Bowden, Murder City On September 30, 2010, David Hartley and his wife, Tiffany, were jet-skiing on Falcon Lake along the Texas-Mexico border when a speedboat approached...

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It Will Be Sudden, It May Be Soon

The Roswell Alien Museum and Research Center is on Main Street, an avenue dotted with trinket shops and ads featuring a big-eyed “alien” hawking hamburgers, gasoline, and the wares of various convenience stores.  At the north end of Roswell is the New Mexico Military Institute, while the flat, brown-gray expanse of the staked plains surrounds...

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Ray Bradbury, R.I.P.

On June 5, we lost not only one of our finest writers but a true American storyteller and one of the last of the book people.  For Ray Bradbury, who passed away at the age of 91, was, like the remnant that Montag joins at the end of Fahrenheit 451, a book person, a walking...

More Human and More Tragic
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More Human and More Tragic

An associate and I were waiting for a flight to Washington, D.C., flying out of Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport, in the fall of 1996.  I spotted another waiting passenger in the lounge and made a bet with my partner, a native New Yorker, that the man was a fellow Texan.  My partner took the bet, and...

The Best Are Not the Brightest
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The Best Are Not the Brightest

Some years ago, in a discussion with the late Joe Sobran about the motivations of those managing our vastly overstretched empire, I pointed out that, for certain strata of the bureaucracy (the people who meet with E.U. officials in Brussels and attend cocktail parties in Georgetown, for example), as well as think-tank warriors theorizing about...

Unspoken Questions
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Unspoken Questions

We live in interesting times.  In June of this year, the U.S. national soccer team played an “away” game against Mexico—in Los Angeles.  Many of the 93,000 fans in the Rose Bowl booed the U.S. squad, chanted obscenities directed at the U.S. goalkeeper, and blew air horns during the U.S. national anthem.  After Mexico won...

A Gentleman and a Scholar
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A Gentleman and a Scholar

The call came just before dinner on a Wednesday in April—a bright, windy day when spring was just taking hold and seemed so full of possibilities.  Coach had died the previous Friday in his hometown of Youngstown, Ohio.  I hoped that he had not been alone. I’m told that a close friend, a man who...

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Breivik: No Patriot, No Christian

As of this writing, stories describing the horrifying bombing and shootings committed in Norway by Anders Beh­ring Breivik are still coming in, but there is enough information available for an attentive reader to draw some preliminary conclusions about the self-identified mass-murderer.  Breivik’s actions and certain sections of his lengthy manifesto belie the mainstream media’s portrayal...

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Osama in Pakistan

Osama bin Laden’s death at the hands of U.S. Navy SEALs, announced on May 1, gives (theoretically, at least) Washington the opportunity to make an exit from Afghanistan and Pakistan, but it most certainly underscored the surreal nature of Washington’s relationship with its “ally” in the region.  Bin Laden was hiding in plain sight in...

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Libya and Putin

Verbal sparring between Premier Vladimir Putin and President Dmitri Medvedev over Western intervention in Libya has raised questions about a split in the Russian “tandem,” and Putin’s criticisms of the intervention may reflect Russian fears of possible U.S. interference in the political struggle in Moscow.  On March 21, Putin compared the Western coalition air strikes,...

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Not Necessarily Muslim

A January 24 bombing at Moscow’s Domodedovo Airport left 35 dead and scores injured, as the Russian capital’s transportation system was targeted by terrorists for the second time in less than a year.  The most likely culprits are Muslim terrorists from the North Caucasus who had struck Moscow’s metro system in March 2010.  In the...

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Russian Migrants

December was a tense month for Russia’s ruling “tandem.”  President Dmitri Medvedev and Premier Vladimir Putin were confronted with violent protests after “Kavkaztsy” (natives of the volatile North Caucasus) killed Yegor Svidirov, a leading member of one of Russia’s unruly and often violent soccer fan clubs, in a Moscow brawl on December 6. On December...

The Bookman
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The Bookman

I remember Granddad as an old man, sitting in his reading chair or working in his garden, but you could still see the younger man in him, the one who had ridden the rails during the Depression, seeking work in California and Oregon with his brother-in-law Vines.  He jumped those trains and saw the West,...

Reaganism and the External Threat
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Reaganism and the External Threat

“There’s a bear in the woods,” warns ad man Hal Riney, as a grizzly appears on screen.  “For some people, the bear is easy to see.  Others don’t see it at all.  Some people say the bear is tame.  Others say it is vicious and dangerous.  Since no one can really be sure who’s right,...

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Child Abuse, the State, and the Russian Family

It was another episode in a series of shocking crimes against children. Little Sasha, just three years old, was pulled from the frigid waters of the Pekhorka River in January 2009. He was bound to a car battery with adhesive tape, his body battered and bearing the marks ...

Who Won the Cold War?
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Who Won the Cold War?

In his Foreword to Witness, Whittaker Chambers, writing in the “form of a letter to my children,” tries to explain the appeal of communism: I see in Communism the focus of the concentrated evil of our time.  You will ask: Why, then, do men become Communists?  How did it happen that you, our gentle and...

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Child Abuse, the State, and the Russian Family

It was another episode in a series of shocking crimes against children.  Little Sasha, just three years old, was pulled from the frigid waters of the Pekhorka River in January 2009.  He was bound to a car battery with adhesive tape, his body battered and bearing the marks of cigarette burns.  It was the second...

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Anatomy of a Murder

The November murder of a missionary Orthodox priest in Moscow highlighted the threats to Russia’s stability from extremist groups, including Muslim terrorists and the far right.  The priest, Daniil Sysoyev, and his aide, Vladimir Strelbitsky, were shot down in a church in Moscow’s Southern Administrative Okrug on November 19.  The gunman, whom some sources described...

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Is Putin Returning?

By the end of 2009, the word on the Moscow grapevine was being picked up by pundits and journalists: Putin’s “return” is in the works, and the premier’s reoccupation of the Kremlin may take place sooner rather than later.  The tandem of Vladimir Putin and his handpicked successor, Dmitri Medvedev, is said to be coming...

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Obama Goes to Moscow

President Obama’s July trip to Moscow was intended to “reset” U.S.-Russian relations but also suggested that there is a continuing tug-of-war in the administration between realists and “democracy builders” regarding Russia policy. The struggle was publicly kicked off by the March report of a commission headed by former Sen. Gary Hart and Sen. Chuck Hagel...

Unnatural Causes
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Unnatural Causes

“For me,” wrote P.D. James in her “fragment of autobiography,” Time To Be in Earnest, “one of the fascinations of detective fiction is the exploration of character under the revealing trauma of murder inquiry.”  Murder “is the unique crime, the only one for which we can never make reparation to the victim.”  As a writer...

What “Terrible Lesson” Can Russia Teach Us?
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What “Terrible Lesson” Can Russia Teach Us?

“We are exceptional people; we are among those nations that . . . exist only to give the world some terrible lesson.” —Pyotr Chaadayev Chaadayev’s words came to mind in the aftermath of a blizzard in Vladivostok, snowy peaks ringing the port city, the sky still obscured by thick clouds.  It was November 1992.  The...

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Change is in the Air

Gov. Rick Perry was a star at the Texas “tea parties,” denouncing Washington and mentioning the s-word—secession—in front of enthusiastic crowds.  Perry had already made headlines by calling for Texas to reject Washington’s “stimulus” funds and by backing a resolution in the Texas House of Representatives affirming the state’s sovereignty, before he fired up the...

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The Journeys of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Shukov felt pleased with life as he went to sleep . . . The end of an unclouded day.  Almost a happy one. [from One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich] The journey is over.  Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn survived war, the Gulag, and cancer; was exiled from his homeland, only to return, having outlived...

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Stumbling Into (Another) War

On August 26, Russian President Dmitri Medvedev recognized the independence of South Ossetia and Abkhazia.  Washington has sharply criticized Moscow for this, while the European Union has threatened sanctions.  Russia and Georgia have signed a cease-fire agreement stipulating that Georgian forces must move back to their bases, while Russian troops are supposed to withdraw to...

A Case of Russophobia
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A Case of Russophobia

John McCain does not like the Russians.  Nearly 17 years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, with Soviet-style communism safely tossed into the dustbin of history, Senator McCain loves to scare us with the Russkie boogeyman.  Take, for example, this excerpt from his “An Enduring Peace Built on Freedom,” published in the November/December 2007...

Anarcho-Tyranny in Action
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Anarcho-Tyranny in Action

In a recent column, Chuck Baldwin (lately nominated as the Constitution Party’s presidential candidate) pointed to something ominous that was largely ignored in the media reporting on the Eliot Spitzer prostitution scandal.  Spitzer had been found out because of “suspicious” financial transactions his bank reported to the authorities.  Dr. Baldwin (who is pastor of a...

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Something Big

We passed the hand warmer around on a cold day in December.  Matthew, my 11-year-old son, got creative and stuck the thing in his shoe.  Rachel, who was spotting for us, didn’t like it much, but she used the hand warmer anyway.  It was that cold; our fingers and toes burned. I look through the...

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Georgians In Londonistan

In February, when 52-year-old Georgian billionaire and political exile Badri Patarkatsishvili died at his Surrey mansion, British media wondered if this might be a Georgian version of the Litvinenko affair.  Patarkatsishvili had been a supporter of President Mikheil Saakashvili’s 2003 “Rose Revolution” but had lately been in opposition to the Georgian president, running against him...

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A Crackdown On Christians

Nursultan Nazarbayev’s regime in Kazakhstan, a recipient of U.S. foreign-aid funds, is cracking down on religious groups it disapproves of, as the congregations associated with Grace Presbyterian Church discovered firsthand this past August, when the KNB (the Kazakh successor to the Soviet-era KGB) raided churches in Karaganda and Oskemen.  Since then, raids, detentions of church...

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The Day of Conception

In Russia’s Ulyanovsk region, the birthplace of Lenin, the regional government has declared September 12 the “Day of Conception,” throwing in a promise of time off work for couples striving to make that day a success.  Such programs have been instituted more frequently since Russian President Vladimir Putin made boosting the country’s birthrate part of...

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Children of a Lesser God?

The plight of Iraq’s Christian community—as followers of the Prince of Peace flee from the country they have lived in since ancient times, their homes and churches burned, their children kidnapped and raped, their priests murdered—has elicited barely any reaction from either the White House or the Muslim government it supports.  The destruction of the...

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Well Into Spring, Even With Snow

Old now is earth, and none may count her days. Earth may be fair, and all men glad and wise. Age after age, their tragic empires rise, Built while they dream, and in that dreaming weep . . . —Old Hundred Twenty-Fourth A white-haired pastor, a white church, a white field.  The snow is falling,...

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Our Terror Sanctuary

The “Fort Dix Six” may not be the smartest group of would-be jihadists we have seen, but their story should tell us something about how lax immigration and border-security policies put this country at risk. The six Muslims were arrested in New Jersey in May, for plotting to attack Fort Dix, which is known as...

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The Yuma Amnesty Files

President Bush was back in Yuma, Arizona, in early April, one year after making promises to secure the border in exchange for a “comprehensive” immigration-reform bill that would increase legal immigration, open the door for up to 20 million illegal aliens to remain in the United States, and encourage yet another surge of illegal aliens...

Iraq as “Intelligence Failure”: We Told You So
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Iraq as “Intelligence Failure”: We Told You So

“W,” a.k.a. “our Commander in Chief,” is apparently even more blindly stubborn and willfully ignorant than I had thought.  As of this writing (December 2006), he is still distancing himself from the Iraq Study Group’s efforts to provide him cover for a withdrawal from the Middle East morass he has drawn us into.  Bush Senior,...

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Goodbye, Mr. Bond

Casino Royale Produced by Barbara Broccoli, Andrew Noakes, and Anthony Waye Directed by Martin Campbell Screenplay by Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, and Paul Haggis Based on the novel by Ian Fleming Released by Columbia Pictures It is with great trepidation and some sadness that I must announce that James Bond is dead.  Granted, there is...

Islam, Immigration, and the Alienists Among Us
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Islam, Immigration, and the Alienists Among Us

In his Introduction to Orthodoxy: The Romance of Faith, G.K. Chesterton casts himself as a man on a yacht seeking the world and finding home.  The seeker, he writes, may have entertained us with his efforts to find “in an anarchist club or a Babylonian temple what I might have found in the nearest parish...