Wayne Allensworth

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Come Home, America
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Come Home, America

The proxy war in Ukraine is a globalist creation that has little to do with American interests. Americans should not emotionally invest in a fight that is not their own, but focus on more important matters at their own borders.

The Tiger, the Lion, and the Old Man
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The Tiger, the Lion, and the Old Man

A day like today reminds you of how you got here, of the struggle, of the good in your life—and of a tiger, a lion, and an old man. The sun shines stark white, shimmering in a way that reminds you that it is a star, technically a yellow dwarf, but it seems not so...

An Easter Reflection: The Mystery of Goodness
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An Easter Reflection: The Mystery of Goodness

The sun broke through the thin, whispery clouds, and its reflection in a pool of water collected from the previous night’s rain caught my eye. Suddenly the day was bright and the morning as clear and joyful as hope itself. Resurrection Day. It was Easter morning in a year that will surely be marked down...

White Man’s Soul Music
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White Man’s Soul Music

“Country music is white man’s soul music.” —Kris Kristofferson “It doesn’t offend us hillbillies, it’s our music.” —Dolly Parton on the term “hillbilly music” “She sounds exactly like where she’s from.” —Vince Gill on Dolly Parton “The old ghosts are always rising up, refusing to be cast aside.” —Ketch Secor Johnny Cash’s At Folsom Prison...

It’s Not Okay to Be White
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It’s Not Okay to Be White

The left now roundly denounces anyone to the right of Jeb Bush as a “white nationalist,” which it appears is now being equated with “white supremacist,” with the apparently immortal Adolph Hitler acting as the once-and-future ringleader of a group of bad guys and gals that includes everyone from George Washington and Betsy Ross to...

The Truth About Afghanistan
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The Truth About Afghanistan

If anyone hasn’t heard about it by now, “our” government has been lying about the lack of progress being made in the seemingly eternal war being fought in Afghanistan. In the 18 years of the longest war in U.S. history, more than $1 trillion has gone down the drain, along with thousands of lives, in...

Ritual, Tragedy, and Restoration
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Ritual, Tragedy, and Restoration

The Deer Hunter received the Academy Award for best picture at the Oscars ceremony in 1979. The film was much criticized by some for its Russian roulette sequences, especially the alleged “racism” on display in the film’s depiction of the Viet Cong. But The Deer Hunter is truly a mythic, poetic work of art. The...

Spying on the American Remnant
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Spying on the American Remnant

As a boy, your author lived in a working-class neighborhood just outside Houston’s city limits. My parents were the children of rural people who had come to Houston looking for work during the Great Depression. They lived in frame houses sitting on cinder blocks in Houston’s West End, a community of people Larry McMurtry called...

Against the Barbarians
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Against the Barbarians

The 21st century is a return to the Age of Walls. As historian and archeologist David Frye writes in his important new book, Walls: A History of Civilization in Blood and Brick, few have noticed that a new era of wall building is now upon us, driven by mass migration and Islamic terrorism. While the...

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The End of Politics

Politics are over in America.  Political maneuvering will go on, of course, but the old civics-class view of American political life was based on a set of assumptions that are no longer operative. America was once far more homogenous than she is today.  But the passing of the 1965 Immigration Act and the political and...

Homesick in America
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Homesick in America

“Darlin,’” she said, “I’ll get that.  Go ahead and take it.”  She was a weathered-looking woman with mousy light brown hair drawn back in a bun and the plain, honest look of one of those faces you see in Depression-era photos from the Dust Bowl, faces that don’t smile—they are just themselves, making the best...

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Never and Always

We shall not cease from exploration And the end of all our exploring Will be to arrive where we started And know the place for the first time. —T.S. Eliot, “Little Gidding”   Precious memories, unseen angels Sent from somewhere to my soul How they linger, ever near me, As the sacred past unfolds I...

A Manner of Speaking
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A Manner of Speaking

On a hot day in late June, looking to buy some cheap tires for an old car of mine, I pulled into a tire shop on a stretch of highway near Fort Worth.  We’d recently had a lot of rain, and the sun was glaring, seeming to draw a screen of haze off the pavement...

Collateral America
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Collateral America

The Mirror Test is John Kael Weston’s testament and witness to seven years of war in Iraq and Afghanistan.  Weston worked as a State Department political officer alongside U.S. Marines and Army soldiers in some of the most dangerous areas of both countries, advising—and sometimes overruling—American military commanders in what became political nation-building operations growing...

Holy Among Fools
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Holy Among Fools

In his latest novel, Derek Turner, author of Sea Changes and Displacement, takes his readers on a seriocomic journey with a latter-day Holy Fool.  Along the way, Turner takes aim at the insanity of political correctness, celebrity culture in the Age of Twitter, and the spiritual wasteland that results from a denial of truth.  A...

Sing Me Back Home
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Sing Me Back Home

Sing me back home with a song I used to hear Make all my memories come alive Take me away and turn back the years Sing me back home before I die Merle Haggard was a real American.  At its best, his music was folk art, Americana poetry, each song capturing a snapshot of his...

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Palm Sunday

On Palm Sunday, I took a walk.  It’s the first day of spring, and the sky is china blue, decorated with small cotton-like puffs of clouds.  Flowers are blooming, and the ducks at the pond have laid their eggs.  The beaver are back—I can tell by the trees they have gnawed down near the pond,...

Manual Control
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Manual Control

Russian political analyst Vladimir Pastukhov once wrote that state power, or vlast, and not law “holds a sacred status in Russia.”  Russians, according to Pastukhov, experience state power as a “mystical entity,” a “life giving substance,” a “deity” in its own right, from whom, in times of trouble, the narod (the people) expects answers. Anna...

A Long Time Gone
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A Long Time Gone

        “How shall we sing the Lord’s songin a strange land?” —Psalm 137:4        “[Man] has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance.  The poet’s, the writer’s, duty is to write about these things.  It is his privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart,...

An American Tragedy
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An American Tragedy

American Sniper has generated more commentary, both scathingly critical and laudatory, than any film in recent memory.  The story of “America’s deadliest sniper,” Texas-born and -bred Navy SEAL Chris Kyle (credited with more than 160 “confirmed” kills), himself shot down in 2013 by a disturbed war veteran he was trying to help, has become a...

The Con Man
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The Con Man

“The more identities a man has, the more they express the person they conceal.” —John le Carré, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy   Fifty years ago, The Spy Who Came in From the Cold completed the most successful transformation of David Cornwell’s shape-shifting life.  The son of a war profiteer and con man became John le...

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Welcoming Terrorists, Locking Down Citizens

Terrorist bombings that killed 3 and wounded and maimed over 260 at the finish line of the Boston Marathon on April 15 prompted the militarized “lockdown” of an American city for days, as police in full combat gear took part in a massive manhunt that may have given us a glimpse of our future. As...

Giving Up, Giving In
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Giving Up, Giving In

“But what if Juárez is not a failure?  What if it is closer to the future that beckons all of us from our safe streets and Internet cocoons?” —Charles Bowden, Murder City On September 30, 2010, David Hartley and his wife, Tiffany, were jet-skiing on Falcon Lake along the Texas-Mexico border when a speedboat approached...

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It Will Be Sudden, It May Be Soon

The Roswell Alien Museum and Research Center is on Main Street, an avenue dotted with trinket shops and ads featuring a big-eyed “alien” hawking hamburgers, gasoline, and the wares of various convenience stores.  At the north end of Roswell is the New Mexico Military Institute, while the flat, brown-gray expanse of the staked plains surrounds...

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Ray Bradbury, R.I.P.

On June 5, we lost not only one of our finest writers but a true American storyteller and one of the last of the book people.  For Ray Bradbury, who passed away at the age of 91, was, like the remnant that Montag joins at the end of Fahrenheit 451, a book person, a walking...

The Best Are Not the Brightest
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The Best Are Not the Brightest

Some years ago, in a discussion with the late Joe Sobran about the motivations of those managing our vastly overstretched empire, I pointed out that, for certain strata of the bureaucracy (the people who meet with E.U. officials in Brussels and attend cocktail parties in Georgetown, for example), as well as think-tank warriors theorizing about...

More Human and More Tragic
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More Human and More Tragic

An associate and I were waiting for a flight to Washington, D.C., flying out of Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport, in the fall of 1996.  I spotted another waiting passenger in the lounge and made a bet with my partner, a native New Yorker, that the man was a fellow Texan.  My partner took the bet, and...

Unspoken Questions
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Unspoken Questions

We live in interesting times.  In June of this year, the U.S. national soccer team played an “away” game against Mexico—in Los Angeles.  Many of the 93,000 fans in the Rose Bowl booed the U.S. squad, chanted obscenities directed at the U.S. goalkeeper, and blew air horns during the U.S. national anthem.  After Mexico won...

A Gentleman and a Scholar
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A Gentleman and a Scholar

The call came just before dinner on a Wednesday in April—a bright, windy day when spring was just taking hold and seemed so full of possibilities.  Coach had died the previous Friday in his hometown of Youngstown, Ohio.  I hoped that he had not been alone. I’m told that a close friend, a man who...

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Breivik: No Patriot, No Christian

As of this writing, stories describing the horrifying bombing and shootings committed in Norway by Anders Beh­ring Breivik are still coming in, but there is enough information available for an attentive reader to draw some preliminary conclusions about the self-identified mass-murderer.  Breivik’s actions and certain sections of his lengthy manifesto belie the mainstream media’s portrayal...

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Osama in Pakistan

Osama bin Laden’s death at the hands of U.S. Navy SEALs, announced on May 1, gives (theoretically, at least) Washington the opportunity to make an exit from Afghanistan and Pakistan, but it most certainly underscored the surreal nature of Washington’s relationship with its “ally” in the region.  Bin Laden was hiding in plain sight in...

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Libya and Putin

Verbal sparring between Premier Vladimir Putin and President Dmitri Medvedev over Western intervention in Libya has raised questions about a split in the Russian “tandem,” and Putin’s criticisms of the intervention may reflect Russian fears of possible U.S. interference in the political struggle in Moscow.  On March 21, Putin compared the Western coalition air strikes,...

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Not Necessarily Muslim

A January 24 bombing at Moscow’s Domodedovo Airport left 35 dead and scores injured, as the Russian capital’s transportation system was targeted by terrorists for the second time in less than a year.  The most likely culprits are Muslim terrorists from the North Caucasus who had struck Moscow’s metro system in March 2010.  In the...

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Russian Migrants

December was a tense month for Russia’s ruling “tandem.”  President Dmitri Medvedev and Premier Vladimir Putin were confronted with violent protests after “Kavkaztsy” (natives of the volatile North Caucasus) killed Yegor Svidirov, a leading member of one of Russia’s unruly and often violent soccer fan clubs, in a Moscow brawl on December 6. On December...

The Bookman
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The Bookman

I remember Granddad as an old man, sitting in his reading chair or working in his garden, but you could still see the younger man in him, the one who had ridden the rails during the Depression, seeking work in California and Oregon with his brother-in-law Vines.  He jumped those trains and saw the West,...

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Child Abuse, the State, and the Russian Family

It was another episode in a series of shocking crimes against children. Little Sasha, just three years old, was pulled from the frigid waters of the Pekhorka River in January 2009. He was bound to a car battery with adhesive tape, his body battered and bearing the marks ...

Who Won the Cold War?
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Who Won the Cold War?

In his Foreword to Witness, Whittaker Chambers, writing in the “form of a letter to my children,” tries to explain the appeal of communism: I see in Communism the focus of the concentrated evil of our time.  You will ask: Why, then, do men become Communists?  How did it happen that you, our gentle and...

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Child Abuse, the State, and the Russian Family

It was another episode in a series of shocking crimes against children.  Little Sasha, just three years old, was pulled from the frigid waters of the Pekhorka River in January 2009.  He was bound to a car battery with adhesive tape, his body battered and bearing the marks of cigarette burns.  It was the second...

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Anatomy of a Murder

The November murder of a missionary Orthodox priest in Moscow highlighted the threats to Russia’s stability from extremist groups, including Muslim terrorists and the far right.  The priest, Daniil Sysoyev, and his aide, Vladimir Strelbitsky, were shot down in a church in Moscow’s Southern Administrative Okrug on November 19.  The gunman, whom some sources described...

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Is Putin Returning?

By the end of 2009, the word on the Moscow grapevine was being picked up by pundits and journalists: Putin’s “return” is in the works, and the premier’s reoccupation of the Kremlin may take place sooner rather than later.  The tandem of Vladimir Putin and his handpicked successor, Dmitri Medvedev, is said to be coming...

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Obama Goes to Moscow

President Obama’s July trip to Moscow was intended to “reset” U.S.-Russian relations but also suggested that there is a continuing tug-of-war in the administration between realists and “democracy builders” regarding Russia policy. The struggle was publicly kicked off by the March report of a commission headed by former Sen. Gary Hart and Sen. Chuck Hagel...

Unnatural Causes
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Unnatural Causes

“For me,” wrote P.D. James in her “fragment of autobiography,” Time To Be in Earnest, “one of the fascinations of detective fiction is the exploration of character under the revealing trauma of murder inquiry.”  Murder “is the unique crime, the only one for which we can never make reparation to the victim.”  As a writer...

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Change is in the Air

Gov. Rick Perry was a star at the Texas “tea parties,” denouncing Washington and mentioning the s-word—secession—in front of enthusiastic crowds.  Perry had already made headlines by calling for Texas to reject Washington’s “stimulus” funds and by backing a resolution in the Texas House of Representatives affirming the state’s sovereignty, before he fired up the...

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The Journeys of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Shukov felt pleased with life as he went to sleep . . . The end of an unclouded day.  Almost a happy one. [from One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich] The journey is over.  Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn survived war, the Gulag, and cancer; was exiled from his homeland, only to return, having outlived...

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Stumbling Into (Another) War

On August 26, Russian President Dmitri Medvedev recognized the independence of South Ossetia and Abkhazia.  Washington has sharply criticized Moscow for this, while the European Union has threatened sanctions.  Russia and Georgia have signed a cease-fire agreement stipulating that Georgian forces must move back to their bases, while Russian troops are supposed to withdraw to...

Anarcho-Tyranny in Action
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Anarcho-Tyranny in Action

In a recent column, Chuck Baldwin (lately nominated as the Constitution Party’s presidential candidate) pointed to something ominous that was largely ignored in the media reporting on the Eliot Spitzer prostitution scandal.  Spitzer had been found out because of “suspicious” financial transactions his bank reported to the authorities.  Dr. Baldwin (who is pastor of a...

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Something Big

We passed the hand warmer around on a cold day in December.  Matthew, my 11-year-old son, got creative and stuck the thing in his shoe.  Rachel, who was spotting for us, didn’t like it much, but she used the hand warmer anyway.  It was that cold; our fingers and toes burned. I look through the...

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Georgians In Londonistan

In February, when 52-year-old Georgian billionaire and political exile Badri Patarkatsishvili died at his Surrey mansion, British media wondered if this might be a Georgian version of the Litvinenko affair.  Patarkatsishvili had been a supporter of President Mikheil Saakashvili’s 2003 “Rose Revolution” but had lately been in opposition to the Georgian president, running against him...

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A Crackdown On Christians

Nursultan Nazarbayev’s regime in Kazakhstan, a recipient of U.S. foreign-aid funds, is cracking down on religious groups it disapproves of, as the congregations associated with Grace Presbyterian Church discovered firsthand this past August, when the KNB (the Kazakh successor to the Soviet-era KGB) raided churches in Karaganda and Oskemen.  Since then, raids, detentions of church...

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The Day of Conception

In Russia’s Ulyanovsk region, the birthplace of Lenin, the regional government has declared September 12 the “Day of Conception,” throwing in a promise of time off work for couples striving to make that day a success.  Such programs have been instituted more frequently since Russian President Vladimir Putin made boosting the country’s birthrate part of...