Timothy D. Lusch

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Books in Brief: The Crusader Strategy
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Books in Brief: The Crusader Strategy

The Crusader Strategy: Defending the Holy Land, by Steve Tibble (Yale University Press; 376 pp., $35.00). If one gets his Crusades history from Karen Armstrong or the History Channel, one is likely to think that nasty and brutish Franks

Books in Brief: January 2021
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Books in Brief: January 2021

The Crusader Strategy: Defending the Holy Land, by Steve Tibble (Yale University Press; 376 pp., $35.00). If one gets his Crusades history from Karen Armstrong or the History Channel, one is likely to think that nasty and brutish Franks

Rebranding the Right
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Rebranding the Right

American Conservatism: Reclaiming an Intellectual Tradition; Edited by Andrew J. Bacevich; Library of America; 663 pp., $29.95

 

A couple years after Russell Kirk’s death, I made a pilgrimage to his ancestral home in Mecosta, Michigan. My buddy and I

Dictatorship of the Deranged
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Dictatorship of the Deranged

A long time ago, I happened upon a cartoon in some publication or other. A single frame—in the vein of Gary Larson—depicted thousands of sheep rushing headlong off a cliff. In the middle of this great multitude, one particular sheep

Apologizing for the Bother
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Apologizing for the Bother

“It’s a small, white, scored oval tablet.” A little pill stands between Florent-Claude Labrouste and his planned defenestration. It offers only a temporary reprieve from the meaninglessness of life. As the narrator of Michel Houellebecq’s latest novel assures us, Captorix:

The Perpetual Club
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The Perpetual Club

Such were the deep currents of literary life in 18th-century England that a group of friends meeting weekly in a London tavern included men as monumental as Samuel Johnson, Edmund Burke, Adam Smith, and Edward Gibbon. Even those members who

The Crucible of Innovation
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The Crucible of Innovation

It is an inconvenient fact—and one studiously neglected by proponents of unrestricted global migration—that the main military participants in the politically incorrect and toxically masculine medieval Crusades were migrants. Nubian infantry, Egyptian cavalry, Armenian Turcopoles, European knights, and Turkic

A Stretch and a Temptation
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A Stretch and a Temptation

Next year marks the 900th anniversary of Roger of Salerno’s defeat at Ager Sanguinis, the Field of Blood.  The battle raged near Sarmada, west of Aleppo, on June 28, 1119.  Roger, regent of Antioch (for the child Bohemond II),

The Devil We Know
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The Devil We Know

If Ryszard Legutko is correct, there is increasingly little difference between the devil we know and the devil we don’t.  He makes a compelling case for this claim.  The totalitarian temptation, regardless of differences in time, place, and ideology, is

Getting Medieval on Middle Age
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Getting Medieval on Middle Age

I turned forty-one this year.  I left a psychological plateau (a crisis would have been way more exciting) and a legal career behind.  I suppose an alcohol-fueled bender or an illicit affair broadcast on social media would be what most

A Sense of Place
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A Sense of Place

I was born and reared in a small Michigan town known as the home of both Gen. George Armstrong Custer and the La-Z-Boy chair company, an accident of local history most people in town do not find strange.  The juxtaposition