Peter Laurie

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Mr. Eliot’s Dreams
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Mr. Eliot’s Dreams

[This article first appeared in the September 1988 issue of Chronicles.]

Le reve est une seconde vie.
—Nerval

T.S. Eliot has become so thoroughly exalted, especially among conservative intellectuals, as the greatest poetic avatar of Western civilization

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The Case for Anonymous Art

For all of living memory, they have been making this wilderness and calling it art. If you were there in Paris, as I was, for the public sale of the Picasso legacy belonging to the artist’s mistress and model Dora

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The Liechtenstein Academy

“Courage,” said the Philosopher, “is the prime philosophical virtue” (by which he meant the moral kind) “lacking which all the others become irrelevancies one has no nerve to bring oneself to put into practice.” It is a notion from another

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Refuge

When still relatively small, I sang in a church choir whose quality was the envy of our whole capital city diocese, so that its members, who included a chorus of boy sopranos like myself, were recruited, auditioned, trained, and paid.

Augie Old: The Last Man
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Augie Old: The Last Man

Saul Bellow’s It All Adds Up is his first (and given his age probably his last) collection of nonfiction. Mr. Bellow is close to 80. His introduction suggests a mood of self-reformation, not solemn but tending toward testament. He is

Madness in Great Ones
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Madness in Great Ones

The American poet and man of letters John Berryman created in his half-memoir, half-short story “The Imaginary Jew” what is very likely the most powerfully compressed vision of vulgar, visceral racism in our literature. In this present, honorably intended biography

Mr. Eliot’s Dreams
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Mr. Eliot’s Dreams

Le reve est une seconde vie.
—Nerval

T.S. Eliot has become so thoroughly exalted, especially among conservative intellectuals, as the greatest poetic avatar of Western civilization in modern times (a role he must share, though, with Yeats and

Greek Jive
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Greek Jive

“He fell with a thud to the ground and his armor
clattered around him.”

—Homer

War Music, called by its author, Christopher Logue, an “account” of four books of the Iliad of Homer, is not a minor event.

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Ezra Pound’s ‘Language of Eternity’

What (to ask one bizarrely unfashionable question) is civilization? Set aside geography, climate, genetics, and luck. The high classical civilizations are marked by certain indispensible accomplishments: a serious respect for facts; related to this, a steady application of work toward