Katherine Dalton

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Different Women
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Different Women

From the December 1991 issue of Chronicles.

In 1920, when Rose Wilder Lane met Dorothy Thompson, Lane was 33 and working in Paris, writing publicity stories for the American Red Cross. She had started out in California at the San

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Securing the Lincoln Memorial

It is a beautiful prospect, looking east from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

We were there recently on a fine March day, and could see past the Vietnam and Korean Memorials up through the Reflecting Pool (currently under repair

Bury Me With My People
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Bury Me With My People

There he was, Abraham Lincoln in a Confederate Army cap, staring out of the page of an old Courier-Journal.  I had been looking for something else when I happened upon this collateral descendant of the 16th president, photographed in

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Cutting Our Teeth On Twilight

To date, Stephenie Meyer’s young-adult novels about a teenage girl (Bella Swan) and her vampire boyfriend (Edward Cullen) have sold well over 100 million copies worldwide, and the movie versions are still coming.  When a phenomenon is of this scale

Outgrowing Agriculture
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Outgrowing Agriculture

It may be hard for us in the United States to imagine that food could ever be scarce here.  We may worry about avian flu and mad cow disease, and about the general safety of our increasingly mass-produced food supply,

Worrying the Southern Bone
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Worrying the Southern Bone

Longtime readers of Chronicles are familiar with John Shelton Reed, who used to write a column for this magazine.  Those less familiar may recall the occasional news story based on the latest intelligence-gathering done by the University of North Carolina’s

A Faithful Life
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A Faithful Life

In 1994, Lois Lindstrom, an American, moved to Stockholm.  There she befriended Karin Wiking, then in her early 70’s, and from their regular conversations grew this very personal book about Mrs. Wiking’s life and experiences. 

Like so many others

My Ground, Myself
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My Ground, Myself

To a woman who has spent several decades of her life in New Orleans, a city that lies mostly below sea level, any trip out is a journey to higher ground.  And so Catharine Savage Brosman’s title works for a

One of the Lucky Ones
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One of the Lucky Ones

Priscilla Buckley has long been well known to readers of conservative journalism. For nearly three decades, she was managing editor of National Review, a constant font of editing skill, institutional knowledge, good humor, and courtesy. She had a 12-year

Hapless Meals
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Hapless Meals

A few years ago, an old friend of my husband watched her three-year-old son die after eating a tainted hamburger at a fast-food chain in Oregon. She is a pediatrician, and her son had good care; but there was simply

Upstairs, Backstairs
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Upstairs, Backstairs

Anyone writing a novel about thoroughbred racing in Kentucky would think first of setting it at Churchill Downs—that brassy track in Louisville which holds its tinsel-television spectacle of the Kentucky Derby every May. Instead, Alyson Hagy chose Keeneland, Lexington’s track

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The Tobacco Bill

The Tobacco Bill went up in smoke in June, and as I write there’s no telling whether it will resolidify, like Aladdin’s genie, if Congress rubs the lamp. But before we consign the fight to the ancient history file, it’s

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Homegrown

This speech was delivered in April at the Webb School, a private secondary school in Knoxville, Tennessee.

I try not to put on airs about what I do for a living. I would never tell you that writing is dignified

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Peyton Place

Peyton Place is the name of the North Dakota bar where First Lieutenant Kelly Flinn went to relax, and the name sums up her case very well. It has been a soap opera all through. And as often happens in

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One Flea Spare & Other New Plays

Actors Theatre of Louisville started its new play festival 20 years ago—that’s a long life in the American theater, and the Humana Festival of New American Plays achieved institution status several seasons back. Unfortunately, the festival is now a little

The Late Unpleasantness
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The Late Unpleasantness

There is nothing so painfully ironic as a war between countrymen. So when nurse Kate Cumming speaks bitterly in her 1864 diary of “our kind northern friends, who love us so dearly that they will have us unite with them,

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False Colors: The Case of Michael New

Until last summer, Michael New was an unknown 22-year-old Army medic, three years into his eight-year enlistment contract. But in August, New learned that he and his battalion were being assigned to Macedonia, where they would serve under the operational

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Questions to Answer

Michael New, the 22-year-old Army medic who faces a bad conduct discharge for refusing to wear the United Nations uniform, may well lose his fight to clear his record. He was court-martialed and convicted in January, and it seems unlikely

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The Civil War & Hollywood

The Civil War and Hollywood have been a pair ever since Ken Burns—because of potential profits, of course. But most of these recent pictures, with their emphasis on marketing rather than script or acting, have had more in common with

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The Work of Romulus Linney

Beth and John want to break the news in as civilized a manner as possible. After all, they mean to have a pleasant weekend away in their cabin. So, over beers, cheerfully, they tell John’s parents that Beth is leaving

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Merging Local Government

You may think of Louisville, Kentucky—if you think of it at all—as a sprawling, midsize, metropolitan community of 800,000 m the Upper South. But like most other American cities, Louisville is legally not one community, but many. County-wide there

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Saving the Small Farm

St. Matthews Episcopal is a modern, manicured church set in the heart of suburban Louisville’s East End. It contrasts somewhat with the dusty farm truck sitting in its parking lot.

Near the truck, half a dozen people say hello to

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The Lesbian Roommate Case

The lesbian roommate case in Madison, Wisconsin, that has been pending since 1989 was finally given a hearing this past fall. In a decision dated December 27, 1991, Madison Equal Opportunities Commission hearing examiner Sheilah O. Jakobson found that Anne

Different Women
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Different Women

In 1920, when Rose Wilder Lane met Dorothy Thompson, Lane was 33 and working in Paris, writing publicity stories for the American Red Cross. She had started out in California at the San Francisco Bulletin; written biographies of Herbert

Divided Loyalties
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Divided Loyalties

Graham Greene died this year at 86, a ripe old age that was no small accomplishment for a man who at 19 played Russian roulette on the Berkhamsted common until he grew bored with even the possibility of his own

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Human Comedy

American playwrights handle comedy better than tragedy, at least if this year’s Humana Festival of New American Plays at Actors Theatre of Louisville is any gauge. Richard Strand’s farce of corporate ladderclimbing, The Death of Zukavsky, and Jane Martin’s

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Enterprise Zones

Enterprise Zones are the subject of Jeffrey Tucker’s article in this issue; Mr. Tucker found that despite the free-market wrapping paper Jack Kemp’s gift to the American public is only more welfare, this time for businessmen. The original idea, as

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Beyond the Fringe

Our Scottish friends were trying to explain the phenomenon of the television police, and we were trying to understand. Television sets are taxed yearly in Britain and require an annual sticker. But since the sticker buying is done on the

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A One-Sided Debate

At the Univ. of Texas, in answer to criticism that he has turned a freshman English composition class into a one-sided debate on political correctness, English department chairman Joseph Kruppa has made several strongly worded replies. The concerns of his

Much in Little
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Much in Little

When Harlan Hubbard and his wife, Anna, set themselves adrift on the Ohio in late 1946 in a homemade shantyboat, they began not only a five-year river adventure but a way of life together that was as distinctive as

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Refusing Funds

When the NEA’S Council and chairman last July refused to fund four of the eighteen “solo performers and mime” grants the NEA staff had recommended, there was a tremendous reaction from the artists involved and the Joseph Papp crowd. Rejected!

Life in the Happy Valley
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Life in the Happy Valley

My friend Dr. Bob grew up in a coal town called Packard in eastern Kentucky, a place that was abandoned years ago. All that is left these days is kudzu growing over old foundations. He’s a neurosurgeon in Louisville now,

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“Don’t Vote”

“Don’t Vote, it Only Encourages Them” goes the bumpersticker, and it is only one among many signs of voter unrest. Another proposal, newly revived and cropping up in states like Oklahoma and South Dakota, is to reform Congress by limiting

The She-Devil
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The She-Devil

Florence King, a/k/a “Fascist Flossie,” “Ku Klux King,” and “the thinking man’s redneck,” is the author of Southern Ladies and Gentlemen, Reflections in a Jaundiced Eye, Confessions of a Failed Southern Lady, and a number of other books under

Still the Colonies
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Still the Colonies

Since the days when Tom Paine set himself up as chief propagandist for the emerging American colonies the United States has been subject to invasion by British journalists. They come for a variety of reasons. Tired of tax collecting in

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Early Form

The Yale Lit. has returned, but not in the form that some Chronicles readers may remember from the early 80’s, when Andrei Navrozov was editor. The undergraduate magazine (est. 1836) he turned into a national quarterly of arts, letters,

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New American Plays

Actors Theatre of Louisville’s Humana Festival of New American Plays, now in its 14th year, has had its up and downs. But some local grumblings notwithstanding, this year’s festival was much better than last, with two excellent plays and only

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A Defense of Drug Addicts

A defense of drug addicts another one, in the pages of our family magazine? But defend them we must; this time from prohibitionists who would carry on the fight in utero. Recent cases in Wyoming and Michigan have seen pregnant

Good Lovers Are Dead Lovers
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Good Lovers Are Dead Lovers

Charley Bland, as his father describes him, would have been a prodigal son except he never had the gumption to leave home. Still, he has the charm most lost souls have, and for the widowed, 35-year-old narrator of Mary Lee

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All For Love

“Alas, that love should be a blight and shame
To those who seek all sympathies in one!”

—Shelley, “Laon and Cythna”

With the publication of the first volume of an expanded edition of her letters in 1980, and now this

High Times: The Late 60’s in New York
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High Times: The Late 60’s in New York

As 1969 rolled around and the decade was ending, I was six years old and living in a temperate Southern city a thousand miles from New York. Conflict came from wanting to stretch my feet into my brother’s half of

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Five Plays in Search of a Character

In recent years Actors Theatre of Louisville’s artistic director Jon Jory has come under fire for the relative weakness of his new play festival. He should be happy that this year’s season was stronger. Like any other genre, playwriting is

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The Tyranny of Loss

The title of Sara Suleri’s memoir, “Meatless Days,” refers to the Pakistani government’s attempt at conservation following its independence from India in 1947. Tuesdays and Wednesdays were decreed “meatless,” meaning no meat would be sold and supposedly

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Break a Leg

In 1963, when Tyrone Guthrie produced his first season at the new Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis, the States did not have much in the way of regional theater. In a country whose two most famous actors are, respectively, a President

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Siren Song

I’ve Heard the Mermaids Singing
written and directed by Patricia
Rozema Vos Productions

Shall I part my hair behind?
Do I dare to eat a peach?
I shall wear white flannel
trousers, and walk upon the beach.
I have heard

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Why Tell It Straight?

Matewan
written and directed by John Sayles
Cinecom Entertainment Group

In 1920 Matewan was a little town on the western edge of Mingo County, West Virginia, right on the Kentucky border. It was a town owned and run by the

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Full Force

Full Metal Jacket
directed by Stanley Kubrick
screenplay by Kubrick, Michael Herr, and Gustav Hasford
based on the novel The Short-Timers by Hasford; Warner Bros.

Funny, that a film about “Vietnam as it really was,” as Platoon was touted, should