Month: April 2020

Home 2020 April
Hitler vs. the Anglo-Americans
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Hitler vs. the Anglo-Americans

On April 20, Adolf Hitler turns 131. Ten days later comes the 75th anniversary of his earthly demise in the ruins of Berlin, but he is still our contemporary par excellence. He continues to haunt and fascinate. Hitler’s countenance,

The Geopolitics of Coronavirus
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The Geopolitics of Coronavirus

“Nothing will ever be the same again!” The cliché is invoked whenever people think they are facing an event of metahistorical significance. Sometimes its use is justified: Sarajevo 1914, the Bolshevik Revolution, Hiroshima, and the fall of the Berlin Wall

Epidemic for the Record Books
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Epidemic for the Record Books

As the hysterical coronavirus overreaction crashes our economy, I can’t help but think of the Spanish flu, which took some 675,000 American lives in 1918 and 1919. Adjusting for the difference in the size of the American population then and

The Unclubbable
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The Unclubbable

The late Joe Sobran used to refer to liberal high society as “the hive.” What Joe was highlighting were certain qualities that he associated with the fashionable left, e.g., extreme clannishness, the exclusion of those who deviated from authorized political

Faux Originalism
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Faux Originalism

Is Antonin Scalia’s originalism—indeed, constitutional self-government itself—passé? The eternal temptation to read one’s own values into the Constitution beguiles even religious conservatives espousing natural law.

The U.S. Constitution is the “supreme law of the land,” whose ultimate interpretation is

What the Editors Are Reading
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What the Editors Are Reading

No one so much as pauses when the mob shouts down reasonable voices during a panic. Just witness the media’s daily performance during the COVID-19 crisis. CNBC hit the ejector button on author James Grant during a live broadcast when

Books in Brief
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Books in Brief

The Long Night of the Watchman: Essays by Václav Benda, 1977-1989 (St. Augustine’s Press; 352 pp., $35.00). On July 4, 1983, in Prague, there occurred one of those moments that may rightly be considered a single loose pebble that caused

Remembering William F. Buckley, Jr.
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Remembering William F. Buckley, Jr.

Two years after the death of the man whom one of his biographers, John Judis, dubbed the patron saint of modern conservatism, Encounter Books brought out a splendidly packaged omnibus volume of his columns and essays, entitled Athwart History: Half

Family Finances
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Family Finances

Parasite may be both the most amusing and the most horrifying movie of the year. That is, if you can get past its inept attempt at making a political statement. 

Written and directed by Bong Joon-ho, Parasite recently became the

What Has COVID-19 Done to Our Money?
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What Has COVID-19 Done to Our Money?

As I write, political factions left and right are sparring over the right approach to the coronavirus. I don’t envy President Donald Trump or the members of his coronavirus response team, for they appear to be in a damned-if-you-do, damned-if-you-don’t

In This Number
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In This Number

If you had told me at Christmas that by March the whole office would be working remotely due to a state emergency order to combat a global pandemic, I wouldn’t have believed you. But here we are.

Without a doubt,

Traditionalism Redux
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Traditionalism Redux

Many intemperate critics have attacked President Trump and his intellectual influences. Benjamin Teitelbaum is not one of them. Cleverer and more fair-minded than most critiques, War for Eternity strives to show that many modern national conservative and populist movements are

Remembering Willmoore Kendall
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Remembering Willmoore Kendall

Among the 20th-century conservative movement’s legendary leaders, Willmoore Kendall (1909-1967) stands out as the one who most effectively offered a grounding in a specifically American philosophy. There is also a timeliness in this remarkable political scientist’s thought. Our society has

Fatal Amendments
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Fatal Amendments

Enthusiastic defenders of the First and Second Amendments to the Constitution are fundamentalist cultists—and women and minorities are their victims.

At least, that is the thesis of University of Miami law professor Mary Anne Franks’ new book, The Cult of

Coins of the Realm
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Coins of the Realm

When he was president, Theodore Roosevelt, a patron of arts and letters, commissioned the redesign of American coins, especially the small denominations in common circulation, from the penny to the dollar.

He was right to complain about the existing designs;