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Manifesto of a Paleo Fellow Traveller
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Manifesto of a Paleo Fellow Traveller

The Stakes: America at the Point of No Return

by Michael Anton

Regnery Publishing

500 pp., $32.99

Michael Anton attracted widespread public notice in Sept. 2016 as the author of a pseudonymous article in the Claremont Review called “The

Books in Brief: July 2021
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Books in Brief: July 2021

Who Is My Neighbor? An Anthology in Natural Relations, by Thomas Achord and Darrell Dow (584 pp., $24.99). The headmaster of a classical Christian school has teamed up with a statistician to collect and sort thousands of quotations pertaining

Faulknerian Presentism
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Faulknerian Presentism

The Life of William Faulkner. Volume 1: The Past Is Never Dead, 1897–1934

512 pp., $34.95

The Life of William Faulkner. Volume 2: This Alarming Paradox, 1935–1962

656 pp., $34.95

by Carl Rollyson

University of Virginia Press

Readers might be

The Strange Case of Dr. Dickens  and Mr. Drood
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The Strange Case of Dr. Dickens and Mr. Drood

The Mystery of Charles Dickens

By A. N. Wilson

Harper Collins

319 pp., $32.50

It’s no secret that Charles Dickens was in an unhappy marriage to his wife, Catherine, and that the great author was verbally and emotionally abusive to

What We Are Reading: June 2021
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What We Are Reading: June 2021

Marriage and divorce. Is there any topic on which it is easier to find self-professed conservatives who somehow cannot bring themselves even to seriously contemplate the truly conservative position than this one? Louis de Bonald’s On Divorce remains, more than

Grappling With Armageddon
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Grappling With Armageddon

The Bomb: Presidents, Generals, and the Secret History of Nuclear War; by Fred Kaplan; Simon & Schuster; 384 pp., $18.00

In 1958, former RAF officer Peter George (under the pseudonym Peter Bryant) wrote Red Alert, a novel about a

Laughing at the Hereafter
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Laughing at the Hereafter

Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife; by Bart D. Ehrman; Simon & Schuster; 352 pp., $28.00

Were popular success an index of scholarly mastery, Broadway musical composer Andrew Lloyd Webber would be recognized as a world authority

What the Editors Are Reading: April/May 2021
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What the Editors Are Reading: April/May 2021

The novelist Martin Amis is the son of Kingsley Amis, whose Lucky Jim (1954) was a spectacular success. Noting the father’s “brilliance and ‘facile bravura,’” Atlantic critic Geoffrey Wheatcroft asserted that Martin “misunderstood his hereditary gifts when he turned from

What the Editors Are Reading: March 2021
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What the Editors Are Reading: March 2021

Someone’s head must have rolled at the Aspen Institute when Anand Giridharadas’ book came out. Giridharadas didn’t miss a rung as he climbed the American establishment’s social ladder: born in Shaker Heights, schooled at Sidwell Friends, the University of Michigan,

The Life of the Mind
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The Life of the Mind

Lost in Thought: The Hidden Pleasures of an Intellectual Life; by Zena Hitz; Princeton University Press; 240 pp., $22.95

What do I need to know for the test?” This common refrain, repeated endlessly by high school and undergraduate

Transitional Failures
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Transitional Failures

Irreversible Damage: The Transgender Craze Seducing Our Daughters; by Abigail Shrier; Regnery Publishing; 276 pp., $28.99

You’ve seen the yard signs. “We believe…Black Lives Matter; No Human is Illegal; Love is Love…” The tone is pure emotive posturing, until you

Haunts of Hobbits
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Haunts of Hobbits

The Worlds of J.R.R. Tolkien: The Places That Inspired Middle-earth; by John Garth; Princeton University Press; 208 pp., $29.95

Authors have always imagined alternate universes, but in the bulging gazetteer of authorial Erewhons—from the transient town of Abaton via

Books in Brief: March 2021
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Books in Brief: March 2021

America’s Revolutionary Mind, by C. Bradley Thompson (Encounter Books; 584 pp., $32.99). Thompson’s examination of colonial America’s natural rights political culture and the effects of the Declaration’s oft-quoted passage about unalienable rights is not likely to please members of the

The Court’s Own Critic
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The Court’s Own Critic

The Essential Scalia: On the Constitution, the Courts, and the Rule of Law; By Antonin Scalia; Edited by Jeffrey S. Sutton and Edward Whelan; Foreword by Justice Elena Kagan; Crown Forum; 368 pp., $35.00

 


Steven Calabresi, one of the 

Middle American Aviatrix
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Middle American Aviatrix

Taking Flight: The Nadine Ramsey Story; by Raquel Ramsey and Tricia Aurand; University Press of Kansas, 2020; 312 pp., $29.95

 

Taking Flight tells the remarkable tale of a courageous woman, Nadine Ramsey, who survived a difficult childhood to become Kansas’

Books in Brief: February 2021
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Books in Brief: February 2021

Catholic & Identitarian, by Julien Langella (Arktos Media; 338 pp., $38.95). French commando Dominique Venner committed suicide inside Notre-Dame Cathedral in 2013 as an act of protest against unrestricted Islamic immigration. One cannot but censure Venner’s sacrilegious act. Yet,

Dilution of Heroes
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Dilution of Heroes

Napoleon and de Gaulle: Heroes and History; By Patrice Gueniffey; Belknap Press; 416 pp., $35.00

 


Both Napoleon Bonaparte and Charles de Gaulle rose in a time of turmoil and war to restore order. Napoleon’s service to France lay in

What the Editors Are Reading: December 2020
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What the Editors Are Reading: December 2020

Richard Holbrooke was the most shameless self-promoter in Washington D.C., a town that specialized in self-promotion, as George Packer writes in Our Man: Richard Holbrooke and the End of the American Century. He was a social climber par excellence,

Secession Becomes Thinkable
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Secession Becomes Thinkable

American Secession: The Looming Threat of a National Breakup; by F. H. Buckley; Encounter Books; 184 pp., $23.99

 


When asked whether a state can constitutionally secede from the United States, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia brushed the question aside,

What the Editors Are Reading
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What the Editors Are Reading

The New York Times recently spoke ex cathedra on the American founding through its “1619 Project.” You probably learned in grade school a cartoonish story about white guys in powdered wigs declaring America’s independence in 1776. The Sulzberger family’s College

Rebranding the Right
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Rebranding the Right

American Conservatism: Reclaiming an Intellectual Tradition; Edited by Andrew J. Bacevich; Library of America; 663 pp., $29.95

 

A couple years after Russell Kirk’s death, I made a pilgrimage to his ancestral home in Mecosta, Michigan. My buddy and I

The Poor Man’s Sam Francis
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The Poor Man’s Sam Francis

The New Class War: Saving Democracy From the Managerial Elite; by Michael Lind; Portfolio; 224 pp., $25.00

 


A mostly white, cosmopolitan “overclass” rules America with a technocratic fist through the union of public and private spheres after pulling off

Books in Brief: October 2020
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Books in Brief: October 2020

Retroculture: Taking America Back, by William S. Lind (Arktos Media; 212 pp., $18.95). One of the editors of this publication practically laughed in my face when I recently proclaimed myself a “city girl.”

“You’re not a city girl,” he

Books in Brief
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Books in Brief

Russian Conservatism, by Paul Robinson (Northern Illinois University Press; 300 pp., $39.95). Canadian historian Paul Robinson has written a highly accessible study of Russian conservatism that extends from the early 19th century down to the present time.

According

What the Editors Are Reading
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What the Editors Are Reading

Everyone to Bernie Sanders’ right gasped in 1994 when radical British historian Eric Hobsbawm argued that Communist regimes who murdered millions “would still have been worth backing” had there been a “chance of a new world being born in great

What Civil Rights Hath Wrought
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What Civil Rights Hath Wrought

The Age of Entitlement: America Since the Sixties; by Christopher Caldwell; New York: Simon & Schuster; 352 pp., $28.00

 

The social and legal order that emerged from the civil rights movement of the 1960s now dominates public life. While

Catholic Comfort for a Wounded South
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Catholic Comfort for a Wounded South

Catholic Confederates: Faith and Duty in the Civil War South by Gracjan Kraszewski; The Kent State University Press; 216 pp., $45.00

 

Brother Brutus J. Clay, S.J., was a fixture at Loyola University in the early-to-late 1990s. The wiry Southerner with

Old Story, New Resonances
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Old Story, New Resonances

A New World Begins: The History of the French Revolution by Jeremy D. Popkin; Basic Books; 640 pp., $35.00

 


Zhou Enlai was asked in the early 1970s what he, one of the architects of the Chinese communist revolution, thought of

A Decadent Diagnosis
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A Decadent Diagnosis

The Decadent Society: How We Became Victims of Our Own Success by Ross Douthat; Avid Reader Press; 272 pp., $27.00

 

The ancient latin aphorism per aspera ad astra (“through rough things, to the stars”) might well be a fitting epigraph

Solid Strategy, Limited Vision
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Solid Strategy, Limited Vision

Metternich: Strategist and Visionary by Wolfram Siemann; Translated by Daniel Steuer; Belknap Press, Harvard University; 928 pp., $39.95

 

All states need a strategy, however rudimentary, in order to survive. Great powers need much more: a viable grand strategy for war

Books in Brief
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Books in Brief

The Shortest Way With Defoe—Robinson Crusoe, Deism, and the Novel, by Michael B. Prince (University of Virginia Press; 350 pp., $69.50). Daniel Defoe’s 1722 novel A Journal of the Plague Year has been much-read recently, for obvious reasons. But

What the Editors Are Reading
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What the Editors Are Reading

Stendhal was the pen name of Marie-Henri Beyle, who adopted it from the name of a German town he had seen with Napoleon’s army. His 1839 novel of the Napoleonic era, La Chartreuse de Parme (The Charterhouse of Parma), was

Slaying Dragons, Coddling Snakes
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Slaying Dragons, Coddling Snakes

The Dragons and the Snakes: How the Rest Learned to Fight the West by David Kilcullen; Oxford University Press; 336 pp., $27.95

 

When the West defeated the Soviet Union, CIA Director R. James Woolsey, Jr., observed that we had

What Made the Founders Happy
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What Made the Founders Happy

[The Pursuit of Happiness in the Founding Era: An Intellectual History by Carli N. Conklin; University of Missouri Press; 254 pp., $40.00]

The intellectual roots of the American founding and in particular the Declaration of Independence have long been

Books in Brief
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Books in Brief

How Dead Languages Work, by Coulter H. George (Oxford University Press; 240 pp., $25.00). If, like University of Virginia classics professor Coulter George, you find dead languages an “endless source of intellectual delight,” then perhaps it’s time to explore

The Philosopher’s Ball Game
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The Philosopher’s Ball Game

[Infinite Baseball: Notes from a Philosopher at the Ballpark by Alva Noë; Oxford University Press; 208 pp., $21.95]

I artificially altered my body to become a better baseball player.

No, I didn’t take performance-enhancing drugs, though PED use was

Madison Avenue’s Soviet Mole
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Madison Avenue’s Soviet Mole

[The Millionaire Was a Soviet Mole: The Twisted Life of David Karr by Harvey Klehr; Encounter Books, 2019; 288 pp., $25.99]

A distinguished professor of history at Emory University, Harvey Klehr has in a number of books exposed the

What the Editors Are Reading
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What the Editors Are Reading

Swedish author Pär Lagerkvist won the Nobel Prize for literature largely on account of his remarkable novel Barabbas (1950). It is like and unlike the best of other such novels based on events surrounding the life of Christ: Henryk Sienkiewicz’s

Empire States of Mind
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Empire States of Mind

Imperial Legacies: The British Empire
Around the World

by Jeremy Black
Encounter Books
216 pp., $25.99

Although this relatively short book is closer to an extended, episodic essay than to the comprehensive history of the British empire implied by the

The Mind Behind Big Brother
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The Mind Behind Big Brother

The Ministry of Truth: The Biography of
George Orwell’s
1984

by Dorian Lynskey
Doubleday
368 pp., $28.95

Few works in literature are as terrifying as 1984, that look into the future written by George Orwell and published in 1949.

What the Editors Are Reading
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What the Editors Are Reading

Robert Louis Stevenson’s novella of split personality, the Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886) immediately caught the attention of the late Victorian reading public and has been catching attention from new audiences ever since. It has provided